11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nile, Prefab Sprout, Talk Talk, and The xx. In the case of Woman’s Hour, everything centers on vocalist Fiona Burgess, who brings human tenderness to subtle but stunning songs such as the title track, “To the End,” “Two Sides of You,” and “Devotion.” Even when the rhythms bounce upward, surprisingly on “Darkest Place” (earning comparisons to Beach House) and more expectedly on “Her Ghost” and “The Day That Needs Defending,” Burgess brings a vulnerability that adds further dimensions to everything she touches. William Burgess’ guitar work never veers from its context, working as much behind the scenes as weaving additional layers of texture with keyboardist Josh Hunnisett for sister Fiona to exploit. “In Stillness We Remain” swirls with a touch of old-school Cocteau Twins. Bassist Nicolas Graves provides a sober pulse while all else is an intoxicating shimmer. As a debut album, Conversations sounds unusually assured and experienced, as if the band must be hiding something on their shelves. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nile, Prefab Sprout, Talk Talk, and The xx. In the case of Woman’s Hour, everything centers on vocalist Fiona Burgess, who brings human tenderness to subtle but stunning songs such as the title track, “To the End,” “Two Sides of You,” and “Devotion.” Even when the rhythms bounce upward, surprisingly on “Darkest Place” (earning comparisons to Beach House) and more expectedly on “Her Ghost” and “The Day That Needs Defending,” Burgess brings a vulnerability that adds further dimensions to everything she touches. William Burgess’ guitar work never veers from its context, working as much behind the scenes as weaving additional layers of texture with keyboardist Josh Hunnisett for sister Fiona to exploit. “In Stillness We Remain” swirls with a touch of old-school Cocteau Twins. Bassist Nicolas Graves provides a sober pulse while all else is an intoxicating shimmer. As a debut album, Conversations sounds unusually assured and experienced, as if the band must be hiding something on their shelves. 

TITLE TIME

More By Woman's Hour

You May Also Like