8 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ed Motta might be a Brazilian postmodern musical hero, but he never lets his influences overwhelm his singular style. On Criterion of the Senses, the vocalist and composer’s 14th album, he continues to indulge his love of nostalgic, sophisticated rock with monster studio musicians like keyboardist Michel Limma and drummer Sergio Melo, and with sardonic lyrics, complex harmonies, and slick production. And he moves deeper into the time-honored Brazilian practice of “cannibalizing” other sounds as a means of authentic expression. The result is pure Motta: A funky bridge breaks up the Michael McDonald smoothness of the “The Required Dress Code,” a clichéd rock riff supports his satirical ’80s yearning on “Shoulder Pads,” and his neo-soul sound brings a unique personality to Steely Dan-style chords on “Lost Connection to Prague.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ed Motta might be a Brazilian postmodern musical hero, but he never lets his influences overwhelm his singular style. On Criterion of the Senses, the vocalist and composer’s 14th album, he continues to indulge his love of nostalgic, sophisticated rock with monster studio musicians like keyboardist Michel Limma and drummer Sergio Melo, and with sardonic lyrics, complex harmonies, and slick production. And he moves deeper into the time-honored Brazilian practice of “cannibalizing” other sounds as a means of authentic expression. The result is pure Motta: A funky bridge breaks up the Michael McDonald smoothness of the “The Required Dress Code,” a clichéd rock riff supports his satirical ’80s yearning on “Shoulder Pads,” and his neo-soul sound brings a unique personality to Steely Dan-style chords on “Lost Connection to Prague.”

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