11 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Florida Georgia Line's debut gave country music an urban reboot. The genre had been combined with modern urban flavors before, but never as seamlessly and infectiously as on Here’s to the Good Times. When the duo brought together a rap-inflected lyrical flow and a Southern rock swagger on “Cruise,” it was like Gabriel’s trumpet bringing down the last stylistic barriers still standing. And the shift into a romantic, R&B-tinged tune like “Dayum, Baby” shows that besides being unparalleled party-starters, Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley pack plenty of melodic know-how.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Florida Georgia Line's debut gave country music an urban reboot. The genre had been combined with modern urban flavors before, but never as seamlessly and infectiously as on Here’s to the Good Times. When the duo brought together a rap-inflected lyrical flow and a Southern rock swagger on “Cruise,” it was like Gabriel’s trumpet bringing down the last stylistic barriers still standing. And the shift into a romantic, R&B-tinged tune like “Dayum, Baby” shows that besides being unparalleled party-starters, Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley pack plenty of melodic know-how.

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