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Vancouver, 1958

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Album Review

Oscar Peterson's trio with Ray Brown and Herb Ellis lasted from 1953 to 1959 and is well documented on records, but the appearance in 2003 of this previously unreleased 1958 concert at the Orpheum Theatre in Vancouver is welcome news to the pianist's fans. Buoyed by a receptive audience and always in the mood to play to the best of their abilities, the musicians outdo themselves throughout the set. Among the highlights are lengthy explorations of "How High the Moon" (which is centered around Brown's tasty solo) and Peterson's "The Music Box Suite," cooking interpretations of a pair of the late Clifford Brown's best-known compositions ("Joy Spring" and "Daahoud"), and a pair of little-known originals by Ellis (including a lovely solo ballad, "Patricia," and the blistering "Pogo"). Add it all up and any fan of Oscar Peterson will want to add this Just a Memory CD to his or her collection.

Biography

Born: August 15, 1925 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s

Oscar Peterson was one of the greatest piano players of all time. A pianist with phenomenal technique on the level of his idol, Art Tatum, Peterson's speed, dexterity, and ability to swing at any tempo were amazing. Very effective in small groups, jam sessions, and in accompanying singers, O.P. was at his absolute best when performing unaccompanied solos. His original style did not fall into any specific idiom. Like Erroll Garner and George Shearing, Peterson's distinctive playing formed during the...
Full Bio