9 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Alice Cooper had left Beverly Hills and was gazing into TV and vodka bottles at his Arizona home (where a Salvador Dali portrait of the singer hung above the couch) when he decided to make Dada, his final Warner Brothers album. The label had given up on Cooper by then, and the 1982 album tanked. But Dada is Cooper’s most underappreciated, and strangest, album. Here he reunites with hit producer Bob Ezrin (Billion Dollar Babies, Killer) and guitarist/songwriter sidekick Dick Wagner (“Only Women Bleed,” “You and Me”). The trio hadn’t worked in a studio together since 1977’s Lace and Whiskey. Programmed drums and digital strings contemporize things, and Ezrin’s arrangements are a gas with classical riffs and creepy rock overtures that heartily uphold Cooper’s opposing themes. “I Love America” satirizes obtuse Yankee patriotism and predates America’s obsession with hillbilly culture by years, while “Pass the Gun Around” is an alcoholic’s dark double entendre. The pop-wondrous “Dyslexia” would’ve been a hit had anybody cared about Cooper in the early '80s—his Herculean comeback was still a few years ahead.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Alice Cooper had left Beverly Hills and was gazing into TV and vodka bottles at his Arizona home (where a Salvador Dali portrait of the singer hung above the couch) when he decided to make Dada, his final Warner Brothers album. The label had given up on Cooper by then, and the 1982 album tanked. But Dada is Cooper’s most underappreciated, and strangest, album. Here he reunites with hit producer Bob Ezrin (Billion Dollar Babies, Killer) and guitarist/songwriter sidekick Dick Wagner (“Only Women Bleed,” “You and Me”). The trio hadn’t worked in a studio together since 1977’s Lace and Whiskey. Programmed drums and digital strings contemporize things, and Ezrin’s arrangements are a gas with classical riffs and creepy rock overtures that heartily uphold Cooper’s opposing themes. “I Love America” satirizes obtuse Yankee patriotism and predates America’s obsession with hillbilly culture by years, while “Pass the Gun Around” is an alcoholic’s dark double entendre. The pop-wondrous “Dyslexia” would’ve been a hit had anybody cared about Cooper in the early '80s—his Herculean comeback was still a few years ahead.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
45 Ratings

45 Ratings

Rat.Bastard ,

Forgotten

DaDa seems to be one of Alice's forgotten albums which is really a shame. DaDa doesn't have the same sound as his earlier albums, but it keeps similar themes (like chilling stories). Despite my general preference for Alice's earlier albums I must say that DaDa is a truly fantastic album. I reall enjoy the first track, DaDa, where Alice is in an asylum being talked to by a doctor of some sorts. He sounds so crazy! And of course Alice gets to inject his own humor into the album in the tracks Dyslexia and I Love America, both of which are very amusing albums. DaDa tells the tale of Former Lee Warmer, a crazy, cannabalistic old man. My personal favorites on the album are Scarlet and Sheba and Pass the Gun Around. This is one album I would love to see played live. Give it a shot, you shouldn't be dissapointed.

SproutGraphics ,

Thank God, It's Finally Here!

I have been waiting for Alice's albums from the 80s to become available via iTunes since the beginning. Definitely worth the wait. This album is one of Alice's very best albums and THE best of his 80s work. It stands alone all of his albums as having a sound all of its own. Eerie and beautiful it is what Welcome to My Nightmare tried to be (and that is, by no means, a slight against that masterpiece). For my money the standout tracks are "DaDa," "Former Lee Warmer" (my favorite), "Fresh Blood" (a close second), and "Pass the Gun Around." That last track is what Ozzy's "Suicide Solution" wishes it could have been.

rpchurch ,

A beautiful mess

Probably Coop's worst performing (from album sales perspective) records, but one that fans of the bizarre are gonna' love. I'm currently discovering this one and, I must say, I am enjoying it thoroughly. If you own no Alice Cooper albums, DO NOT START HERE! This is like an excellent sorbet, after the cocktails (Killers), the starter salad (Love it to Death), and the filet mignon (Love it to Death). And, after you've digested a few other sides (From the Inside, Flush the Fashion, Special Forces), this is a great finisher. By the way, where is the Lace and Whiskey album, Apple? Add that nugget, too.

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