20 Songs, 1 Hour, 3 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Even in the groundbreaking days of 1992, Redman’s Whut? Thee Album stood out with its blend of extra-deep jazz and funk loops and Red’s expertly outlandish rhyme skills. Still, it wasn’t until Dare Iz a Darkside that Redman really began to explore his stunted, blunted unconscious. Returning for a few songs is Erick Sermon, the co-producer of Red’s debut, but Redman handles the bulk of the production himself. The sound here is slowed-down and subterranean, but even as the atmosphere becomes brain-blitzing and hazy, the album just coaxes you into its mist. The bass seems to probe almost unbearably low frequencies on “Bobyahed2dis,” “Da Journee” and “Cosmic Slop.” If at first this strain of hash-oil hip-hop seems too potent for the uninitiated user, start off with the hypnotic hooks of “Can’t Wait” and “Rockafella,” then proceed to “Green Island,” which dares to mix an infectious Hawaiian slide guitar with a stunningly sloped bassline. Redman is a hip-hop fundamentalist at heart, but at times the dank sound design of this '90s classic seems to push the genre to its limits.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Even in the groundbreaking days of 1992, Redman’s Whut? Thee Album stood out with its blend of extra-deep jazz and funk loops and Red’s expertly outlandish rhyme skills. Still, it wasn’t until Dare Iz a Darkside that Redman really began to explore his stunted, blunted unconscious. Returning for a few songs is Erick Sermon, the co-producer of Red’s debut, but Redman handles the bulk of the production himself. The sound here is slowed-down and subterranean, but even as the atmosphere becomes brain-blitzing and hazy, the album just coaxes you into its mist. The bass seems to probe almost unbearably low frequencies on “Bobyahed2dis,” “Da Journee” and “Cosmic Slop.” If at first this strain of hash-oil hip-hop seems too potent for the uninitiated user, start off with the hypnotic hooks of “Can’t Wait” and “Rockafella,” then proceed to “Green Island,” which dares to mix an infectious Hawaiian slide guitar with a stunningly sloped bassline. Redman is a hip-hop fundamentalist at heart, but at times the dank sound design of this '90s classic seems to push the genre to its limits.

TITLE TIME
1:37
3:23
2:26
2:12
3:23
3:32
0:31
2:55
0:24
4:43
5:41
2:02
4:12
4:27
4:08
3:54
4:49
4:12
1:38
3:50

About Redman

Never quite a superstar, Redman was nonetheless one of the most off-the-wall, beloved, and enduring rappers of the '90s and 2000s. Born Reginald Noble in Newark, NJ, he made his initial impact on EPMD's 1990 album Business as Usual and stepped out as a solo artist with 1992's Whut? Thee Album, one of the year's best debuts, rap or otherwise. He blended reggae and funk influences with topical commentary and displayed a terse though fluid vocal style that was sometimes satirical, sometimes silly, and always tough -- an approach that rarely wavered throughout the remainder of his career. Each of Redman's successive releases during the '90s, including Dare Iz a Darkside (1994), Muddy Waters (1996), and Doc's da Name (1999), went gold in the U.S. He was also established as a member of the EPMD-led Def Squad (initially known as the Hit Squad), which put together El Niño (another gold-seller) in 1998. Blackout!, issued a year later, solidified a longtime partnership with Wu-Tang Clan's Method Man. The duo went on to star in the 2001 movie How High, a comedy made for weed smokers, as well as a less successful and short-lived television show (Method & Red) that aired nine episodes on Fox in 2004. Redman released only two solo albums, Malpractice (2001) and Red Gone Wild (2007) during the first decade of the 2000s, but he did close it out with Method Man via Blackout! 2 (2009). The MC's seventh solo album, Reggie, appeared in 2010. ~ Andy Kellman & Ron Wynn

  • ORIGIN
    Newark, NJ
  • BORN
    April 17, 1970

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