13 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Devil Wears Prada’s fourth studio full-length is riddled with low-tuned guitars, skull-bludgeoning rhythms, haunting keyboard ambience, and Mike Hranica’s most explosive vocal performances to date. The title track detonates with ferocious aplomb as Daniel Williams’ drums blast and explode. What’s almost immediately noticeable on Dead Throne is the advanced technical guitar playing throughout – especially on “Untidaled” where deep chugging rhythms stop on a dime to unleash lightning fast fretboard shredding. “Mammoth” is a heavy number that makes good on its title with towering juggernauts of guitar-forged walls of noise and Williams’ relentless attack on the drum kit. This song also spotlights Hranica’s versatile inflections as he effortlessly segues from rabid caterwauls to deep, thundering bellows of pure angst. The more accessible “R.I.T.” plays like a slightly melodic maelstrom with unpredictably angular arrangements and plenty of stop-start rhythms. “Born To Lose” is another standout that magnifies TDWP’s penchant for intelligent contrast – the feral verses somehow blend perfectly with the pop melodies in the choruses.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Devil Wears Prada’s fourth studio full-length is riddled with low-tuned guitars, skull-bludgeoning rhythms, haunting keyboard ambience, and Mike Hranica’s most explosive vocal performances to date. The title track detonates with ferocious aplomb as Daniel Williams’ drums blast and explode. What’s almost immediately noticeable on Dead Throne is the advanced technical guitar playing throughout – especially on “Untidaled” where deep chugging rhythms stop on a dime to unleash lightning fast fretboard shredding. “Mammoth” is a heavy number that makes good on its title with towering juggernauts of guitar-forged walls of noise and Williams’ relentless attack on the drum kit. This song also spotlights Hranica’s versatile inflections as he effortlessly segues from rabid caterwauls to deep, thundering bellows of pure angst. The more accessible “R.I.T.” plays like a slightly melodic maelstrom with unpredictably angular arrangements and plenty of stop-start rhythms. “Born To Lose” is another standout that magnifies TDWP’s penchant for intelligent contrast – the feral verses somehow blend perfectly with the pop melodies in the choruses.

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