12 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Dear Science finesses TVOTR's unusual ability to synthesize the very foundations of classic/prog rock with an atmosphere of futuristic surrealism – both musically and thematically. The first single, “Golden Age,” is subterfuge for a rare strain of optimism in the band’s work, a fantastically perky bass line laying the foundation for a dance track full of shiny horns, fluttering synths and strings, and a heavenly choir of voices. The beautiful “Lover’s Day” (with Eleanore Everdell’s vocals a perfect partner to Kyp Malone’s) is an unabashed celebration of carnal delights, with a phalanx of steady drums, soaring horns, and circling flute meeting up in a powerful coda, accompanied by angelic vocal backing. It’s darn sexy. Opener “Halfway Home” has the same majestic sheen and tension-filled buzz that made “Wolf Like Me” such a potent song, and “Dancing Choose” is an energetic, staccato-rap number moved along by a sly, funky rhythm that builds a head of steam with charging saxophones.  The slow-building, soulful “Shout Me Out” virtually explodes into a fantastic, guitar-heavy crescendo.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Dear Science finesses TVOTR's unusual ability to synthesize the very foundations of classic/prog rock with an atmosphere of futuristic surrealism – both musically and thematically. The first single, “Golden Age,” is subterfuge for a rare strain of optimism in the band’s work, a fantastically perky bass line laying the foundation for a dance track full of shiny horns, fluttering synths and strings, and a heavenly choir of voices. The beautiful “Lover’s Day” (with Eleanore Everdell’s vocals a perfect partner to Kyp Malone’s) is an unabashed celebration of carnal delights, with a phalanx of steady drums, soaring horns, and circling flute meeting up in a powerful coda, accompanied by angelic vocal backing. It’s darn sexy. Opener “Halfway Home” has the same majestic sheen and tension-filled buzz that made “Wolf Like Me” such a potent song, and “Dancing Choose” is an energetic, staccato-rap number moved along by a sly, funky rhythm that builds a head of steam with charging saxophones.  The slow-building, soulful “Shout Me Out” virtually explodes into a fantastic, guitar-heavy crescendo.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5

128 Ratings

128 Ratings

IT'S A MUST BUY!!

jimmy Stewart

This album is a great masterpiece. TVOTR keep their old simple tribalish sounds with their powerful vocal melodies and added some electric beats. They have ditched any negatives from their old sound and taken the positives and completely grown them into a great new sound. The songs are a lot more surrounding and have a beautiful uniqueness to them (ie. Family Tree). I don't know what it is about this band that i love but this album just adds to that mystery. It's a must buy.

One of the Best Indie Rock Albums Ever Created

spiroevil

TV on the Radio was already arguably the defining indie band of this decade (although, to be fair, their only real competition was Arcade Fire). Much in the way that current young people are blown away by older albums like Kid A and OK Computer, future generations in search of older indie music will stumble upon this album and they will be awestruck, euphoric from the perfection this album exudes. No description I could give it would possibly do it justice. Just buy it now. If this album doesn't make them huge, it's safe to say indie rock will never sell big, because this album is everything anyone who appreciates music could possibly ask for. An utter masterpiece.

Disappointing

awesomedude123

So i enjoy their other work very much. Listening through this album i was mostly disappointed. I held no expectations for what i was about to hear because artists and bands can do whatever the heck they want. The beats are very light on this album, and the songs feel strangely unfocused - not what i'm used to hearing from these guys. Not to say that bands should pick a sound and stick with it, this simply doesn't suit what they're capable of. I must add as a comment to other reviewers, "Indie Rock" is not a sound or genre, it's a way of doing business, it's not correct to classify albums as such!

About TV on the Radio

From their beginnings as Brooklyn-based experimenters to one of the most acclaimed bands of the 2000s and 2010s, TV on the Radio mixed post-punk, electronic, and other atmospheric elements in vibrantly creative ways, and are both visual artists as well as musicians. The group began when multi-instrumentalist/producer David Andrew Sitek moved into the building where vocalist Tunde Adebimpe had a loft; each of them had been recording music on his own, but realized their sounds worked well together. Sitek's brother Jason began playing drums and other instruments with the pair during their recording sessions, which resulted in OK Calculator, a self-released disc of four-track recordings. Jason Sitek left the band for a short time due to other musical commitments but returned to the band when it recorded its Touch & Go debut, the Young Liars EP.

After the EP was completed, TV on the Radio added guitarist/vocalist Kyp Malone to their fold. Young Liars, which also features the Yeah Yeah Yeahs' Brian Chase and Nick Zinner, was released in summer 2003 to critical acclaim, coinciding with their gigs opening for the Fall. Their first full-length release, Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes, arrived in spring 2004. The band remained busy for the rest of the year, embarking on its own tours as well as dates with the Faint and the Pixies. That fall, they released the New Health Rock EP and won the 2004 Shortlist Music Prize.

In 2005, the band kept busy with touring and returned to Sitek's Stay Gold studio to work on its second album. They also made an MP3 criticizing President George W. Bush, "Dry Drunk Emperor," available on their website. TV on the Radio signed with 4AD for European distribution of their albums and moved to Interscope in the U.S. In summer 2006 they resurfaced with Return to Cookie Mountain, a more polished but still searching collection of songs that featured David Bowie on backing vocals. The band went in a sleeker direction on 2008's Dear Science, which featured cameos from Antibalas and Celebration's Katrina Ford.

The band went on hiatus following Dear Science. Malone worked on his own project, Rain Machine, and appeared on Iran's 2009 album Dissolver, while Sitek formed the collaborative pop project Maximum Balloon, which released its self-titled debut in 2010. As planned, their hiatus ended the following year, and TV on the Radio released their fifth album, Nine Types of Light, early in 2011. In March of that year, the band announced that bassist Gerard Smith, who had joined the TV on the Radio lineup in 2005, was suffering from lung cancer; the following month, on April 20, 2011, Smith passed away at the age of 34 as a result of the disease. Later that year, the band released World Cafe Live, taken from a set recorded for National Public Radio. Late in 2014, TV on the Radio returned with Seeds, a hopeful, streamlined-sounding set once again featuring production by Sitek. ~ Heather Phares

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