6 Songs, 1 Hour 7 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Eric Whitacre’s vast score for orchestra and choir is a breathtaking response to the iconic 1995 photograph taken by the Hubble Space Telescope of over 3,000 previously unseen galaxies. Deep Field is, in effect, a movie soundtrack, each movement evoking the incomprehensible scale and beauty of the universe. Opening with the expansive “Deep Field: Cathedral of Reason” and the searching “Deep Field: The Pillars of Creation,” the work builds to the colossal, Straussian “Deep Field: Impossible Magnitude.” “Deep Field: Earth Choir,” however, is Whitacre’s masterstroke here, an homage to Holst’s wordless voices that end his The Planets suite. An accompanying film features extraordinary imagery that, together with Whitacre’s music, will have you on the edge of your seat.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Eric Whitacre’s vast score for orchestra and choir is a breathtaking response to the iconic 1995 photograph taken by the Hubble Space Telescope of over 3,000 previously unseen galaxies. Deep Field is, in effect, a movie soundtrack, each movement evoking the incomprehensible scale and beauty of the universe. Opening with the expansive “Deep Field: Cathedral of Reason” and the searching “Deep Field: The Pillars of Creation,” the work builds to the colossal, Straussian “Deep Field: Impossible Magnitude.” “Deep Field: Earth Choir,” however, is Whitacre’s masterstroke here, an homage to Holst’s wordless voices that end his The Planets suite. An accompanying film features extraordinary imagery that, together with Whitacre’s music, will have you on the edge of your seat.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME
6

Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
6 Ratings
6 Ratings
Schmelding ,

Of Course It's Good

This piece very much captures the subject matter in a way that carries our emotions beyond what our eyes could see through Hubble. It reminded me of how Buzz Aldrin stood on, and looked at, the surface of the Moon and summed-up the experience in two profound words: “magnificent desolation.” No robotic probe could do that. Hubble alone could not do that. It was the people who operated Hubble that gave us an opportunity to look far beyond what we thought we knew about God’s creation. Eric Whitacre’s intepretation of the famous Deep Field photo expresses musically what the limiations of our language only allow us to say... “Wow.”

I am thankful for the opportunity and privilege of being able to participate in this project as a Virtual Choir 5 member.

auntie-xochitl ,

A Masterful Fusion of Art and Science

“Deep Field” is a fusion of visual and aural compositions – each, by themselves - is stunning; yet when combined together, is a mesmerizing masterpiece for our eyes and ears.

It overflows with exquisite astronomical images of our Universe as revealed through Science to bring a soaring Secular uplift and a primal Spiritual awe that only Nature can evoke!
Each “blink” brings gorgeous images that float by in the boundless darkness of Space. The music is ethereal and pure, in both its simplicity and complexity. Sound waves are beautifully represented as lacy, feathery fireworks.
The final part of the choir piece struck me as a metaphor for Earth breathing: inhaling and exhaling, as a single organism - which She is - in the vast expanse of Space.

Watching “Deep Field” was a meditative experience that elevated me above worldly worries and melted day-to-day concerns into petty nothingness, if even for just a moment. It was best viewed on a large screen in a darkened room.

How I wish that Galileo, Hubble, and other historic astronomers could have viewed this film! Their work planted the seeds for this masterful work of Art and Science.
Thank you, Eric Whitacre, and to ALL involved for accomplishing this colossal project and inviting the world to sing along.

Petseeyou ,

Thank You

Thank you Mr. Whitacre for the incredible opportunity to sing another one of your chilling pieces of art.

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