10 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After honing their sound in underground metal clubs for three years, Deicide came roaring out of Tampa with this self-titled 1990 debut. Florida had become a hub for the second wave of death metal, thanks to bands like Obituary and Death, both of whom recorded with Scott Burns at his Tampa-based Morrisound Recording Studio. American bands had taken the satanic themes of European death metal bands and crossbred them with the hyper-aggression of Slayer and Metallica. While it wasn’t the earliest death metal album to come out of Florida, Deicide’s first album was definitive. Where Norwegian metal had been icy and trebly, Deicide took the sound of death metal and made it thick and molten. Driven by the double-stacked guitars of brothers Eric and Brian Hoffman and Steve Asheim's indefatigable drumming, “Lunatic of God’s Creation,” “Deicide,” and “Dead by Dawn” raised the stakes of the entire metal genre. What makes this album potent isn't its satanic themes but the unrelenting physicality with which those themes are delivered.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After honing their sound in underground metal clubs for three years, Deicide came roaring out of Tampa with this self-titled 1990 debut. Florida had become a hub for the second wave of death metal, thanks to bands like Obituary and Death, both of whom recorded with Scott Burns at his Tampa-based Morrisound Recording Studio. American bands had taken the satanic themes of European death metal bands and crossbred them with the hyper-aggression of Slayer and Metallica. While it wasn’t the earliest death metal album to come out of Florida, Deicide’s first album was definitive. Where Norwegian metal had been icy and trebly, Deicide took the sound of death metal and made it thick and molten. Driven by the double-stacked guitars of brothers Eric and Brian Hoffman and Steve Asheim's indefatigable drumming, “Lunatic of God’s Creation,” “Deicide,” and “Dead by Dawn” raised the stakes of the entire metal genre. What makes this album potent isn't its satanic themes but the unrelenting physicality with which those themes are delivered.

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About Deicide

Controversy has plagued Florida-based quartet Deicide. During their first tour in 1992, the band was severely criticized for their statements in favor of animal sacrifices. Their Stockholm, Sweden, concert was canceled after four songs when a bomb was discovered on-stage. Led by vocalist/bass player Glen Benton, Deicide has delivered some of the goriest sounds to ever emanate from the Sunshine State. Their songs continue to radiate with the brutal attack of satanic death metal.

Formed in 1987, Deicide quickly released two demos -- Feasting the Beast in 1987 and Sacrificial in 1989 -- under the name Amon. Signing with Roadrunner Records, they changed their name and released their first full-length CD, featuring all six demo tracks, in 1990. They didn't tour until releasing their second album, Legion, in 1992. A string of albums followed, including Amon: Feasting the Beast (1993), Once Upon the Cross (1995), Serpents of the Light (1997), the live When Satan Lives (1998), Insineratehymn (2000), In Torment, In Hell (2001), Scars of the Crucifix (2004), and Stench of Redemption (2006). Deicide's Till Death Do Us Part was released on Earache Records in April 2008. ~ Craig Harris

GENRE
Rock
FORMED
1987

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