23 Songs, 1 Hour 27 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Maybe more than any other rapper in history, Lil Wayne’s output is defined by franchises. An artist should be so lucky to sustain the kind of longevity that would allow for multi-volume phases the likes of Wayne’s Dedication, and Da Drought mixtapes, let alone the series that made him into a superstar, Tha Carter. Though Wayne was not without projects in between, some seven years were allowed to pass between the release of the fourth and fifth installments of the lattermost. Fortunately, Wayne has rewarded his fans’ patience with 23 tracks that speak to a number of his most storied eras.

“Mixtape Weezy,” as Jay-Z famously coined, is alive and well on songs like the Swizz Beatz-produced “Uproar,” Wayne blacking out over a reinterpretation of G-Dep’s 2001 hit “Special Delivery.” The nostalgia doesn’t stop (or peak) there, as Wayne and Snoop Dogg share space over a flip of Dr. Dre’s “Xxplosive” on “Dope N*ggaz,” while Mannie Fresh revisits the Cash Money golden-era bounce of Juvenile’s “Ghetto Children” for “Start This Shit Off Right.” There are nods to the experimental Wayne of the I Am Not A Human Being projects (“Don’t Cry,” “Mess”) and also the rapper’s under-heralded pop wizardry (“Famous,” which features his daughter Reginae as hook singer), and even a love song built on a gospel sample, “Dope New Gospel.” In all, Tha Carter V is an album for anyone who’s missed Wayne—no matter which Wayne they’d missed.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Maybe more than any other rapper in history, Lil Wayne’s output is defined by franchises. An artist should be so lucky to sustain the kind of longevity that would allow for multi-volume phases the likes of Wayne’s Dedication, and Da Drought mixtapes, let alone the series that made him into a superstar, Tha Carter. Though Wayne was not without projects in between, some seven years were allowed to pass between the release of the fourth and fifth installments of the lattermost. Fortunately, Wayne has rewarded his fans’ patience with 23 tracks that speak to a number of his most storied eras.

“Mixtape Weezy,” as Jay-Z famously coined, is alive and well on songs like the Swizz Beatz-produced “Uproar,” Wayne blacking out over a reinterpretation of G-Dep’s 2001 hit “Special Delivery.” The nostalgia doesn’t stop (or peak) there, as Wayne and Snoop Dogg share space over a flip of Dr. Dre’s “Xxplosive” on “Dope N*ggaz,” while Mannie Fresh revisits the Cash Money golden-era bounce of Juvenile’s “Ghetto Children” for “Start This Shit Off Right.” There are nods to the experimental Wayne of the I Am Not A Human Being projects (“Don’t Cry,” “Mess”) and also the rapper’s under-heralded pop wizardry (“Famous,” which features his daughter Reginae as hook singer), and even a love song built on a gospel sample, “Dope New Gospel.” In all, Tha Carter V is an album for anyone who’s missed Wayne—no matter which Wayne they’d missed.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
3.8K Ratings
3.8K Ratings
>••••••<

worth the wait !

Muser11

Over hyped

Wasn’t impressed. Felt like he did in 3 days. Eminem Kamikaze still the best RAP album of the year.

Five Martyrs

Honest Opinion

The Carter V is one of the worst albums I have ever listened to. The synopsis of the whole album is about criticizing women, materialist things, drugs, etc. We get it you want to "portray" yourself as a criminal. How about rapping about things that could be seen as motivational or give awareness to societal/international issues? I really cannot understand how people can listen to this music it clearly lacks artistry and intellect. In my opinion, there were only three solid albums to release so far which was Lupe Fiasco, The Carters, and maybe Nas (ruined because Kanye's production). Whether it's Lil Wayne, Drake (every album sounds the same as So Far Gone), Yachty, etc... I have come to the realization that people in America are becoming more and more brain dead by the day. So if you're gullible and most are, I look forward to seeing you play the victim on your local news channel.

About Lil Wayne

When Lil Wayne debuted as a 12-year-old kid on the B.G.’z 1995 album True Story, it wasn’t exactly clear that he’d become one of the best rappers of his generation. It’s not just that he’s clever or funny—it’s the way his style manages to balance classic, boast-driven rap with the kind of wild metaphors and constellatory thinking often left to poets. In other words, Wayne didn’t just get high, he ate stars; he didn’t just devour rappers, he told you—in gross, gastrointestinal detail—how they felt going down, stretching the conventional vocabulary of rap to its limits. A native of New Orleans (“That’s why I holler ‘Hollygrove’ on each and every song,” he raps on Tha Carter II’s “Fly In”), Wayne (born Dwayne Carter in 1982) started writing rhymes at eight or nine, attracting the attention of Cash Money Records cofounder Bryan “Baby” Williams by freestyling relentlessly into Williams’ voicemail. (As recently as 2015, Wayne still knew the number by heart.) After joining the short-lived but influential Hot Boys with fellow Cash Money rappers Juvenile, B.G., and Turk, Wayne launched an instantaneously successful solo career, exploring his ever-evolving lyricism while moving further into the mainstream, turning out a dizzying string of albums and mixtapes in the 2000s that were as radical as they were popular, his Tha Carter series most notable among them. In 2005, he managed to find time to start Young Money Entertainment, signing Nicki Minaj and Drake before most people knew their names. Beset by legal troubles (including a one-year sentence at Rikers Island), health issues (including an epilepsy diagnosis), and disagreements with his label, Wayne had a rough start to the 2010s but barely slowed down, releasing a steady stream of albums and mixtapes—including full-length collaborations with T-Pain and 2 Chainz—that continued to mine his seemingly endless imagination. Even if he made good on his periodic threats to retire (he called 2018’s Tha Carter V his last studio album), the fallout from his impact is everywhere, from Young Thug to Migos to Tyler, the Creator and Chance the Rapper—anyone who zigs when the rest zag.

HOMETOWN
New Orleans, LA
BORN
September 27, 1982

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