11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After the relative expansiveness of Gordon Lightfoot's previous album, Summer Side of Life, the Canadian troubadour scaled things back a bit on the follow-up, 1972's Don Quixote. Here, he focused on a mix of acoustic guitar-led folk-pop and subtle orchestration similar to the blend that earned him international fame in 1970 for "If You Could Read My Mind." It remains puzzling that the perky, infectious title track was relegated to B-side status, but its A-side, "Beautiful," remains one of the most affecting romantic ballads in Lightfoot's catalog. "Alberta Bound" has the feel of an instant folk standard, while Lightfoot's country side comes out in the celebration of rural life "Brave Mountaineers," the lonesome plaint "Second Cup of Coffee," and the subtle-but-strong political statement of "The Patriot's Dream." Don Quixote closes with its best-known tune, "Beautiful," a lambent reminder of Lightfoot's powers as a romantic crooner.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After the relative expansiveness of Gordon Lightfoot's previous album, Summer Side of Life, the Canadian troubadour scaled things back a bit on the follow-up, 1972's Don Quixote. Here, he focused on a mix of acoustic guitar-led folk-pop and subtle orchestration similar to the blend that earned him international fame in 1970 for "If You Could Read My Mind." It remains puzzling that the perky, infectious title track was relegated to B-side status, but its A-side, "Beautiful," remains one of the most affecting romantic ballads in Lightfoot's catalog. "Alberta Bound" has the feel of an instant folk standard, while Lightfoot's country side comes out in the celebration of rural life "Brave Mountaineers," the lonesome plaint "Second Cup of Coffee," and the subtle-but-strong political statement of "The Patriot's Dream." Don Quixote closes with its best-known tune, "Beautiful," a lambent reminder of Lightfoot's powers as a romantic crooner.

TITLE TIME

More By Gordon Lightfoot

You May Also Like