12 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Working with Midlake’s McKenzie Smith, Sarah Jaffe further explores the electronic worlds that often befuddle acoustic singer/songwriters. Though Jaffe was once looked upon as an acoustic coffeehouse type of person, the defiant young Texan discovered she didn’t need to ruminate over the same old "cowboy chords" to get her emotive insights across. If anything, Jaffe has found a far more personal sound within scattered synthesizer notes and fractured mechanical beats. Songs such as “Ride It Out” with its fat buzzy synth, “Fatalist” with its easy-rolling gait, and “Either Way” with more ghostly arrangements, certainly extend the concept of who Jaffe can be. But at the heart of these songs, and especially the later tracks, such as “Slow Pour” and “Your Return,” there’s a sense of comfort, a sense of discovery, and a sense of relief in finding new ways to express oneself that don't rely on the same worn schematics that made Jaffe feel like just another in a long line of sensitive singer/songwriters. Here, she’s clearly finding a new self.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Working with Midlake’s McKenzie Smith, Sarah Jaffe further explores the electronic worlds that often befuddle acoustic singer/songwriters. Though Jaffe was once looked upon as an acoustic coffeehouse type of person, the defiant young Texan discovered she didn’t need to ruminate over the same old "cowboy chords" to get her emotive insights across. If anything, Jaffe has found a far more personal sound within scattered synthesizer notes and fractured mechanical beats. Songs such as “Ride It Out” with its fat buzzy synth, “Fatalist” with its easy-rolling gait, and “Either Way” with more ghostly arrangements, certainly extend the concept of who Jaffe can be. But at the heart of these songs, and especially the later tracks, such as “Slow Pour” and “Your Return,” there’s a sense of comfort, a sense of discovery, and a sense of relief in finding new ways to express oneself that don't rely on the same worn schematics that made Jaffe feel like just another in a long line of sensitive singer/songwriters. Here, she’s clearly finding a new self.

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About Sarah Jaffe

A singer/songwriter with electro-pop ambitions, soulful Texas crooner Sarah Jaffe weaves stark folk-pop narratives whose gentle melodies belie the deeper, dancefloor-ready confectioner within. On the title track of her debut EP, Jaffe sang "I'm testament to old and new," which served as a nice introduction to the singer/songwriter's timeworn folk side. Her tart, at times bluesy voice had the sepia tint of dustbowl troubadours of yore and the sad crack and throb of a '70s confessional folkie. Delicate guitar picking and literate lyrics rounded out the aesthetic, but Jaffe also proved to be capable of kicking up a full-band rumble as well, with albums like Suburban Nature pointing to a decidedly punky force behind the quiet façade.

Born in 1986 in Texas, Jaffe burst onto Denton's indie scene in a big way during the late 2000s, making memorable live appearances at venues like the Austin City Limits festival and winning recognition in several categories at the Dallas Observer Music Awards. Raves for her initial EP, 2008's Even Born Again, in the American and U.K. press, as well as an international tour supporting the band Midlake, raised the singer's profile even further, and she signed a deal with Kirtland Records late in 2009, who released the full-length Suburban Nature as her official debut in 2010. The home-recorded The Way Sound Leaves a Room EP arrived in 2011, followed by the evocative full-length The Body Wins in 2012 and the electro-pop-minded Don't Disconnect in 2014. ~ Paula Carino & Steve Leggett

HOMETOWN
Red Oak, TX
BORN
January 29, 1986

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