12 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

All Time Low's fifth studio album finds the band back on Hopeless Records. But a return to its indie label doesn't warrant a return to its indie roots. Rather than backpedal for the sake of nostalgia, this Baltimore quartet injects the pop half of its emo-pop sound with sonic steroids. “The Reckless and the Brave” opens, boasting what sounds like impressively expensive and pristine production. Multilayered guitars, a metronome-timed rhythm section, and Alex Gaskarth's overlapping vocals were mixed with the laser precision of a classic AOR album by Journey or Boston. This makes most of the songs on 2012’s Don’t Panic play with a larger-than-life feel suited for arena-sized stages and commercial radio airplay. But if you like catchy, unflawed guitar pop, this is hardly a bad thing. Check out the unarguably catchy “Sometime in Neverland,” a salient single that chugs on power pop chords à la Weezer or Fountains of Wayne before triggering a chorus peppered with more barbed hooks than a tackle box. “For Baltimore” celebrates the band's hometown with similarly exaggerated pop aplomb.

EDITORS’ NOTES

All Time Low's fifth studio album finds the band back on Hopeless Records. But a return to its indie label doesn't warrant a return to its indie roots. Rather than backpedal for the sake of nostalgia, this Baltimore quartet injects the pop half of its emo-pop sound with sonic steroids. “The Reckless and the Brave” opens, boasting what sounds like impressively expensive and pristine production. Multilayered guitars, a metronome-timed rhythm section, and Alex Gaskarth's overlapping vocals were mixed with the laser precision of a classic AOR album by Journey or Boston. This makes most of the songs on 2012’s Don’t Panic play with a larger-than-life feel suited for arena-sized stages and commercial radio airplay. But if you like catchy, unflawed guitar pop, this is hardly a bad thing. Check out the unarguably catchy “Sometime in Neverland,” a salient single that chugs on power pop chords à la Weezer or Fountains of Wayne before triggering a chorus peppered with more barbed hooks than a tackle box. “For Baltimore” celebrates the band's hometown with similarly exaggerated pop aplomb.

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Customer Reviews

5 out of 5

2007 Ratings

This is how the All Time Low of 2012 should sound.

Shane O'Donohue,

While Dirty Work had a few gems, I was not the biggest fan of the album (and neither were many other ATL fans). I was somewhat apprehensive of the follow-up, yet hopeful that it would be a comeback album of sorts. AND IT IS.

Don’t Panic is All Time Low at its finest; this record feels like a greatest hits album! “Somewhere in Neverland” is classic ATL, “So Long Soldier calls back to The Party Scene days (chorus of “Circles,” anyone?), “Backseat Serenade” is a flat-out jam, and “Outlines” sounds like one of the best songs Fall Out Boy never wrote (although it was co-written with P. Stump). I could go on and on about how good these songs are, but you should just make the purchase and find out for yourself. The only hiccup is “The Irony of Choking on a Lifesaver,” which is still better than most of ATL’s previous pop attempts. Overall, it’s the most solid album ATL’s crafted!

This is the album that All Time Low regains fans and acquires new ones, while keeping the dedicated rest of us. Congrats, boys. This is the record we’ve been waiting for!

I think my ATL days are over...

sikesy7,

I don't want to be too harsh or crtical. I honestly haven't liked anything they've come out since "So wrong it's right." "Nothing Personal" is when things started to go down hill in my opinion atleast for me. People say bands change all the time but I think it's actually more accurate to say I think us fans change. So I'm not going to put all the blame on them. When I first started listening to ATL in 2004 I was 16 and I was into this music they being from the hometown I digged it. But now I'm almost 24 and I think its safe to say I've outgrown them or maybe even this genre. "The Party Scene" their first full length is and in my opinion will always be their best album. It was raw and not over produced like it is now. I'll take it for what it's worth. ATL you were a huge part of my music life in my teen years but being an adult now I think it's time for me to move on. This is the last ATL album I buy.

About All Time Low

Formed in 2003 in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland, All Time Low started out as a high-school cover band before morphing into a melodic emo-pop act. Singer/guitarist Alex Gaskarth and guitarist Jack Barakat were All Time Low's co-founders, with bassist Zack Merrick and drummer Rian Dawson rounding out their energetic pop-punk sound and rowdy live shows, which often included silly string and beach balls. Honing their skills between homework and other teenage commitments, the guys managed to tour across the East Coast and the south during school breaks. They issued a four-song EP, 2004's The Three Words to Remember in Dealing with the End, with help from local label Emerald Moon, and followed its release with a full-length album, The Party Scene, one year later.

Touring across the country that summer, the guys found themselves on bills with similar acts like Motion City Soundtrack, the Early November, and Plain White T's. Along the way, All Time Low also bumped into fellow pop-punkers Amber Pacific, who brought the young band to the attention of their label, Hopeless Records. The label was immediately impressed, and All Time Low had officially become part of the Hopeless family by March 2006, just a few months shy of the members' high school graduation. Finally done with schoolwork and able to concentrate full-time on music, the group issued Put Up or Shut Up -- a seven-song EP that mostly featured new recordings of older material -- that July.

All Time Low supported the EP's release with a handful of Warped Tour dates before hitting the road again with Amber Pacific. So Wrong, It's Right appeared in 2007, marking the band's first full-length release for Hopeless. After being named 2008's Band of the Year by Alternative Press, All Time Low returned with their second album, Nothing Personal, in July 2009. Debuting at number four on the Billboard charts, Nothing Personal helped make All Time Low one of the top emo-pop acts in the business. Two CD/DVD packages, MTV Unplugged and Straight to DVD, were released the following year, tiding fans over while the guys returned to the studio to begin work on their major-label debut for Interscope Records.

Dirty Work, featuring the single "I Feel Like Dancin'," was released in 2011. The album reached number six on the Billboard charts the week it was released, and the band hit the road. In 2012, All Time Low announced they had parted ways with Interscope and released a new song, "The Reckless and the Brave," on their website in June. Soon after, they re-signed with Hopeless and began work on a new album. Don't Panic was released in November of 2012, then reissued almost a year later with four newly recorded songs and four acoustic versions under the name Don't Panic: It's Longer Now! In 2015, All Time Low returned with their sixth record, Future Hearts, which found them reuniting with their Dirty Work producer, John Feldmann. In 2016, they released Straight to DVD 2: Past, Present & Future, a sequel to the 2010 live album. In February 2017, the band issued the single "Dirty Laundry," in anticipation of their seventh studio long-player, Last Young Renegade, which dropped later that June. ~ Corey Apar

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