12 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With a list of songs hand-selected and arranged by Blossom herself, Once Upon a Summertime is the most seductive of the singer’s early albums for Verve. She continues to use her squeaky-clean voice to maximum effect, but there is increasingly self-assurance to her delivery. She still sings like a teacher’s pet, but “Moonlight Saving Time,” “Teach Me Tonight” and “We’re Together” are surprisingly sexy, albeit in the slyest, subtlest way. Though her persona is pure innocence, Blossom has clearly had a lot of experience in the relationship department. Every song — whether the drowsily delirious “Once Upon a Summertime” or the bouncy, sassy “Down With Love”— finds a new way to express the workings of male-female fancies. Her version of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Surrey With the Fringe On Top” is a career performance, and arguably the song’s finest reading. The song requires an equal order of whimsy and sincerity. It’s an unusual combination that escapes most singers, but happens to be Blossom’s essential formula.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With a list of songs hand-selected and arranged by Blossom herself, Once Upon a Summertime is the most seductive of the singer’s early albums for Verve. She continues to use her squeaky-clean voice to maximum effect, but there is increasingly self-assurance to her delivery. She still sings like a teacher’s pet, but “Moonlight Saving Time,” “Teach Me Tonight” and “We’re Together” are surprisingly sexy, albeit in the slyest, subtlest way. Though her persona is pure innocence, Blossom has clearly had a lot of experience in the relationship department. Every song — whether the drowsily delirious “Once Upon a Summertime” or the bouncy, sassy “Down With Love”— finds a new way to express the workings of male-female fancies. Her version of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Surrey With the Fringe On Top” is a career performance, and arguably the song’s finest reading. The song requires an equal order of whimsy and sincerity. It’s an unusual combination that escapes most singers, but happens to be Blossom’s essential formula.

TITLE TIME

About Blossom Dearie

A distinctive, girlish voice, crisp, impeccable delivery, and an irrepressible sense of playful swing made Blossom Dearie one of the most enjoyable singers of the vocal era. Her warmth and sparkle ensured that she'd never treat standards as the well-worn songs they often appeared in less capable hands. And though her reputation was made on record with a string of excellent albums for Verve during the '50s, she remained a draw with Manhattan cabaret audiences long into the new millennium.

Actually born with the name Blossom Dearie in the New York Catskills, she began playing piano at an early age and studied classical music before making the switch to jazz while in high school. After graduation, she moved to New York and began appearing with vocal groups like the Blue Flames (attached to Woody Herman) and the Blue Reys (with Alvino Rey). She also played cocktail piano around the city, and moved to Paris in 1952 to form her own group, the Blue Stars of France. Dearie also appeared in a nightclub act with Annie Ross, and made a short, uncredited appearance on King Pleasure's vocalese classic, "Moody's Mood for Love." She recorded an obscure album of piano solos, and in 1954, the Blue Stars hit the national charts with a French version of "Lullaby of Birdland."

After hearing Dearie perform in Paris in 1956, Norman Granz signed her to Verve and she returned to America by the end of the year. Her eponymous debut for Verve featured a set of standards that slanted traditional pop back to its roots in Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, and cabaret. Her focus on intimate readings of standards ("Deed I Do," "Thou Swell") and the relaxed trio setting (bassist Ray Brown and drummer Jo Jones, plus Dearie on piano) drew nods to her cabaret background.

On her next few records, Dearie stuck to her focus on standards and small groups, though her gift for songwriting emerged as well with songs like "Blossom's Blues." She performed in solo settings at supper clubs all over New York, and appeared on the more cultured of the late-'50s New York talk shows. Her husband, flutist Bobby Jaspar, made several appearances on her records, notably 1959's My Gentleman Friend. After a recording break in the early '60s, Blossom Dearie signed to Capitol for one album (1964's May I Come In?), but then recorded sparingly during the rest of the decade.

Finally, in the early '70s, she formed her own Daffodil Records label and began releasing her own work, including 1974's Blossom Dearie Sings and the following year's My Favorite Celebrity Is You. She also performed at Carnegie Hall with Anita O'Day and Joe Williams, billed as the Jazz Singers. She continued to perform and record during the 1980s through to the early 2000s, centered mostly in New York but also a regular attraction in London as well. She retired from playing live in 2006 due to health concerns and died quietly in her Greenwich Village apartment on February 7, 2009. ~ John Bush

HOMETOWN
East Durham, NY
GENRE
Jazz
BORN
April 28, 1926

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