14 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Double screening” is the increasingly common practice of engaging with two electronic devices at once. On this outing by French saxophonist and composer Emile Parisien, it seems the intent is less to pronounce judgment or poke fun than to evoke a certain chaos, with writing of extraordinary range and virtuosity. The vehicle is a quartet almost identical to Parisien’s 2014 release Spezial Snack with pianist Julien Touéry and bassist Ivan Gélugne, but Julien Loutelier is on drums in place of Sylvain Darrifourcq. Loutelier not only contributes the first two and last two pieces but brings an enhanced and radical array of percussive timbres to the project. We get three “Spam” movements—brief unsolicited interruptions, each by a different composer, highly dissimilar in outline and mood. We also get Parisien’s four-part “Hashtag” mini-suite, with seamless segues and steady evolution from jaunty out-of-tempo musings to briskly accelerating rhythm. Parisien is warm and inviting on soprano sax throughout; his sole switch to tenor occurs halfway through Touéry’s “Malware Invasion,” depicted in swing time full of instability and surprise.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Double screening” is the increasingly common practice of engaging with two electronic devices at once. On this outing by French saxophonist and composer Emile Parisien, it seems the intent is less to pronounce judgment or poke fun than to evoke a certain chaos, with writing of extraordinary range and virtuosity. The vehicle is a quartet almost identical to Parisien’s 2014 release Spezial Snack with pianist Julien Touéry and bassist Ivan Gélugne, but Julien Loutelier is on drums in place of Sylvain Darrifourcq. Loutelier not only contributes the first two and last two pieces but brings an enhanced and radical array of percussive timbres to the project. We get three “Spam” movements—brief unsolicited interruptions, each by a different composer, highly dissimilar in outline and mood. We also get Parisien’s four-part “Hashtag” mini-suite, with seamless segues and steady evolution from jaunty out-of-tempo musings to briskly accelerating rhythm. Parisien is warm and inviting on soprano sax throughout; his sole switch to tenor occurs halfway through Touéry’s “Malware Invasion,” depicted in swing time full of instability and surprise.

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