15 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though he's been on the scene for a solid decade now (debuting in 2003 with Camouflage), Billy Woods has stayed extremely under the radar, unknown to all but the most intense subterranean hip-hop archeologists. Over the last 10 years he's dropped a gang of records (solo joints as well as group efforts with Super Chron Flight Brothers and Invizzibl Men), established the label Backwoodz Studioz, and consistently impressed thanks to his densely layered, reference-heavy lyricism paired with against-the-grain production. On Dour Candy, he joins forces with Blockhead, who provides plenty of adventurous, sample-driven beats ideal for Woods' wordy storytelling. Standout tracks include the horn-driven "One Thousand One Nights," the first-person taxi-driver jam "Hack," and the spooky closer, "Cuito Cuanavale." Intensely personal and autobiographical, this isn't the kind of music you'd throw on at a house party. But for fans of left-field, heady indie-rap, it's pretty solid.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though he's been on the scene for a solid decade now (debuting in 2003 with Camouflage), Billy Woods has stayed extremely under the radar, unknown to all but the most intense subterranean hip-hop archeologists. Over the last 10 years he's dropped a gang of records (solo joints as well as group efforts with Super Chron Flight Brothers and Invizzibl Men), established the label Backwoodz Studioz, and consistently impressed thanks to his densely layered, reference-heavy lyricism paired with against-the-grain production. On Dour Candy, he joins forces with Blockhead, who provides plenty of adventurous, sample-driven beats ideal for Woods' wordy storytelling. Standout tracks include the horn-driven "One Thousand One Nights," the first-person taxi-driver jam "Hack," and the spooky closer, "Cuito Cuanavale." Intensely personal and autobiographical, this isn't the kind of music you'd throw on at a house party. But for fans of left-field, heady indie-rap, it's pretty solid.

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