11 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Texas native Sunny Sweeney was raised on classic honky-tonk and Merle Haggard (she even has a “Mama Tried” tattoo on her wrist). Marinated in the twangy tones of yesteryear, her amazing 2007 debut, Heartbreaker’s Hall of Fame, was too retro for radio. So she moved to Nashville and employed the help of Music City’s A-list songwriters. Subsequently, her sophomore album resonates with a more radio-friendly sensibility. But don’t think for a second that Sweeney succumbed to crossover pop hooks or headset microphones. “Drink Myself Single” is a gussied-up honky-tonk hit that kicks off 2011’s Concrete with Telecasters, fiddle, boozy pedal steel, and Sweeney’s own endearing vocals. “From a Table Away” is a slower number with barbed melodies and a gripping narrative where Sweeney sings like a young Natalie Maines. “Amy” boasts a brilliant point of view from the other woman—imagine Jolene replying to her namesake Dolly Parton hit.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Texas native Sunny Sweeney was raised on classic honky-tonk and Merle Haggard (she even has a “Mama Tried” tattoo on her wrist). Marinated in the twangy tones of yesteryear, her amazing 2007 debut, Heartbreaker’s Hall of Fame, was too retro for radio. So she moved to Nashville and employed the help of Music City’s A-list songwriters. Subsequently, her sophomore album resonates with a more radio-friendly sensibility. But don’t think for a second that Sweeney succumbed to crossover pop hooks or headset microphones. “Drink Myself Single” is a gussied-up honky-tonk hit that kicks off 2011’s Concrete with Telecasters, fiddle, boozy pedal steel, and Sweeney’s own endearing vocals. “From a Table Away” is a slower number with barbed melodies and a gripping narrative where Sweeney sings like a young Natalie Maines. “Amy” boasts a brilliant point of view from the other woman—imagine Jolene replying to her namesake Dolly Parton hit.

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