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Changes One

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Album Review

Charles Mingus' finest recordings of his later period are Changes One and Changes Two, two Atlantic LPs that have been reissued on CD by Rhino. The first volume features four stimulating Mingus originals ("Remember Rockefeller at Attica," "Sue's Changes," "Devil Blues" and "Duke Ellington's Sound of Love") performed by a particularly talented quintet (tenor-saxophonist George Adams who also sings "Devil Blues," trumpeter Jack Walrath, pianist Don Pullen, drummer Dannie Richmond and the leader/bassist). The band has the adventurous spirit and chance-taking approach of Charles Mingus' best groups, making this an easily recommended example of the great bandleader's music.

Customer Reviews

Since you can only buy two tracks individually...

... you have to buy the whole album to get the other two. However, it's worth it for "Duke Ellington's Sound of Love" alone, which is the best version out there of this track. George Adams plays a great solo, as do Pullen and Mingus. It's a pity iTunes views music like a sack of potatoes, charging by the length, since so many great jazz and classical tracks can't be purchased individually; as if we bought songs just because they were long and we could "get over on" the record companies by buying one track instead of two!

Biography

Born: April 22, 1922 in Nogales, AZ

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s

Irascible, demanding, bullying, and probably a genius, Charles Mingus cut himself a uniquely iconoclastic path through jazz in the middle of the 20th century, creating a legacy that became universally lauded only after he was no longer around to bug people. As a bassist, he knew few peers, blessed with a powerful tone and pulsating sense of rhythm, capable of elevating the instrument into the front line of a band. But had he been just a string player, few would know his name today. Rather, he was...
Full Bio