12 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Damn Right, I’ve Got the Blues is one of a handful of albums that pushed Chicago blues into the modern age. After laying low for most of the '80s, Buddy Guy came roaring back on the scene with renewed purpose. He was obviously energized by the leftfield choice in producer. Englishman John Porter was best known as engineer of the Smiths and Roxy Music, two bands who are about as far from Guy’s sweat-soaked city blues as you can get. Yet, Porter’s booming production brings new life to Guy’s music. Rather than retrofitted, these songs sound revitalized. Their strength is aided in no small part by a powerhouse rhythm section comprised of Chicago blues bassist Greg Rzab and former Little Feat drummer Richie Hayward. The heavyweight guest-list — Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Mark Knopfler — doesn’t detract from Guy, but instead underscores his inimitable talent. Guy might not be as fast or as flashy as his junior competitors, but every note shoots off him with the force of a shockwave.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Damn Right, I’ve Got the Blues is one of a handful of albums that pushed Chicago blues into the modern age. After laying low for most of the '80s, Buddy Guy came roaring back on the scene with renewed purpose. He was obviously energized by the leftfield choice in producer. Englishman John Porter was best known as engineer of the Smiths and Roxy Music, two bands who are about as far from Guy’s sweat-soaked city blues as you can get. Yet, Porter’s booming production brings new life to Guy’s music. Rather than retrofitted, these songs sound revitalized. Their strength is aided in no small part by a powerhouse rhythm section comprised of Chicago blues bassist Greg Rzab and former Little Feat drummer Richie Hayward. The heavyweight guest-list — Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Mark Knopfler — doesn’t detract from Guy, but instead underscores his inimitable talent. Guy might not be as fast or as flashy as his junior competitors, but every note shoots off him with the force of a shockwave.

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About Buddy Guy

Keith Richards called him the godfather. Eric Clapton likened his impact to Elvis’. And Hendrix reportedly said that heaven was lying at his feet while listening to him play. But Buddy Guy tends to weigh himself a little more modestly: “Music makes people happy,” he said. “And that’s why I go on doing it.” The Louisiana-born guitarist got his footing as a session man with Chicago’s Chess Records. In the years to follow, he synthesized the traditions of Delta blues with a fierce, theatrically modern style, embracing volume and distortion before they were vernacular, sometimes playing with his teeth and feet and using an extra-long cable to wander through the crowd and onto the street, soloing the whole way. As beloved as he is as a player, Guy also serves as an ambassadorial figure, bridging the gap between his generation of collaborators—which includes B.B. King and Junior Wells—and later ones, working first with British blues acolytes like Jeff Beck and The Rolling Stones, then with artists like John Mayer. A sharp wit, Guy sums up his trajectory: “When I went to Chicago, I'll put it like this: I was looking for a dime and I found a quarter.”

HOMETOWN
Lettsworth, LA
GENRE
Blues
BORN
July 30, 1936

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