11 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A quarter-century into his recording career, Rodney Crowell delved deep and came up with a stunning work of art on Fate’s Right Hand (2003). The Texas-born singer/songwriter had enjoyed both commercial success and critical praise — now he was ready to face up to the big questions of life, loss and suffering without worrying about the marketplace. As on 2001’s The Houston Kid, Crowell couches his confessions in country-rock terms, invoking everyone from Roy Orbison to Marty Robbins and the Beatles in his tunes. Aiding him are such Nashville notables as banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck, guitarist Richard Bennett and singers Gillian Welch and Kim Richey, among others. Whether he’s updating rockabilly in “This Too Shall Pass,” reworking bluegrass in “Preachin’ To The Choir” or recalling the British Invasion with “Come On Funny Feeling,” his touch is sure. It’s the lyrics, though, that distinguish this album. Songs like “Riding Out The Storm” and “Earthbound” search for hope in a fallen world, painting their themes with sweeping imagery. On “Still Learning How To Fly,” Crowell reveals a rage to live that’s thrilling to hear. By owning up to long-buried fears and dreams, Fate’s Right Hand grabs the listener’s heart.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A quarter-century into his recording career, Rodney Crowell delved deep and came up with a stunning work of art on Fate’s Right Hand (2003). The Texas-born singer/songwriter had enjoyed both commercial success and critical praise — now he was ready to face up to the big questions of life, loss and suffering without worrying about the marketplace. As on 2001’s The Houston Kid, Crowell couches his confessions in country-rock terms, invoking everyone from Roy Orbison to Marty Robbins and the Beatles in his tunes. Aiding him are such Nashville notables as banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck, guitarist Richard Bennett and singers Gillian Welch and Kim Richey, among others. Whether he’s updating rockabilly in “This Too Shall Pass,” reworking bluegrass in “Preachin’ To The Choir” or recalling the British Invasion with “Come On Funny Feeling,” his touch is sure. It’s the lyrics, though, that distinguish this album. Songs like “Riding Out The Storm” and “Earthbound” search for hope in a fallen world, painting their themes with sweeping imagery. On “Still Learning How To Fly,” Crowell reveals a rage to live that’s thrilling to hear. By owning up to long-buried fears and dreams, Fate’s Right Hand grabs the listener’s heart.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
20 Ratings
20 Ratings
clareware ,

Earthbound, just about brings me to tears of joy.

I love music, it touches my heart, comforts me in difficult times, inspires me in good times. This is an album full of outstanding compositions. Earthbound is what caught my ear on the radio some years after it came out and is one of my favorite songs of my life. Fates Right Hand, the title song is remarkable as are several other songs. Songs of personal growth, regret, loss. Songs that touch on what is to be a human being who thinks about sex and gadgets. Great stuff.

Dlcntn ,

Must have

Love every song!

Dave3451 ,

Rodney Crowell

It just doesn't get any better than Rodney Crowell and this is one of his best.I have seen Rodney in concert many times and he is the real deal just a great album by a great person.

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