iTunes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn't open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from Eat a Peach by The Allman Brothers Band, download iTunes now.

Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

Open iTunes to preview, buy, and download music.

Editors’ Notes

The Allman Brothers Band not only survived the death of slide guitarist Duane Allman in the midst of the Eat a Peach sessions, they subsequently emerged with an extraordinary double album that showcased their many stylistic sides. Ultimately, the band cobbled together a potent mix of nine tracks; three studio cuts with Duane on board, three scintillating tracks from 1971’s monumental Fillmore East shows, and three more studio performances completed after Duane’s tragic motorcycle accident. “Melissa” and “Blue Sky,” with Duane and Dickey Betts trading licks, added a distinct country feel to the set, but the centerpieces remain the live workouts – two ripping blues covers and the 33-minute “Mountain Jam,” which set a standard for improvisational rock that’s rarely been matched.

Customer Reviews

Classic Rock Masterpiece

Eat a Peach is one of my favorite albums to listen to. I can listen to it at anytime and be in the mood for it. I can't say that for the rest of my albums. Here's the breakdown 1. Ain't Wastin' Time No More (4/5) - A good opening song, can get you hooked into the rest of the album. 2. Les Bres in A Minor (5/5) - A great song once you get past the opening bit. A great musical song, Not one to listen to over and over again though. And you'll need to let it grow on you. 3. Melissa (4/5) - Now some people might get mad at me for giving Melissa a 4, but it's definitley not the best song that the Allman Brothers ever did. Yes, it is a good song, but it not the best on this album. 4. Mountain Jam (4/5) - The length is what does it for me in the end, but if it were maybe 20 minutes long, it would be a 5/5. A great jam session to listen to, but you may get a bit bored after a while. 5. One Way Out (5/5) - I love this song, and I'm not sure why. It always seems to make me feel good whenever I listen to it. 6. Trouble No More (5/5) - A great riff, and a great blues song. This one is the third best on the album. Great lead guitar from Dicky. Buy this song if you don't wand the whole album. 7. Stand Back (3/5) - Weakest song on the album. But still good just listening. Don't underestimate this song, you may like it more than me. 8. Blue Sky (5/5) - My favorite song on the album. Whenever I listen to it, I can't help but hum or sing along to it. The guitar solo in this song is amazing. 9. Little Martha (5/5) - A great little guitar ditty at the end of the album. A great song to listen to, or play for that matter. A nice ringing sound that Duane gives makes the song much more enjoyable. Second best on the album. Many, many great songs. Best album that the Allman Brothers did in the studio, Fillmore East is pretty good too. I highly recommend this album.

Melissa and more

My neice Melissa was named by my brother in law Rick after this track. This album is a wonderful mellow time capsule for the Brothers. There isn't a track on this that isn't really listenable and rewarding. But, check out "Les Brers in A Minor", and consider that the band that did this was stoner to the core. It's amazing, really, transcends rock jazz whatever. The Allman Brothers remain a true American band from the South with style to burn. And what a band it's been, facing tragedy and rebirth -- over and over. Eat This Peach.

A Master's Masterpiece after he is gone

Along with LIVE AT FILLMORE EAST, this is the Allman Brothers best album. Unfortunatley, their leader, Duane Allman, did not live to complete the album. His playing is on 2/3 of the album. The first three songs were recorded without him. Gregg Allman's "Melissa" is the best of these three acknowledged by Duane as one of his best songs, although the song's last verse was reworked in memory of the lost brother. "Ain't Wastin' Time No More" is another fantastic Gregg Allman number. "Les Brers in A Minor" (Cajun Frech for "The Brothers in A Minor") is a moving Dickey Betts instrumental, although Duane's presence is missed. This song is a shadow of what's to come in the next few years. Still a great song. The next three songs are live from the Fillmore East: "Mountain Jam" alone is reason enough to buy the album. Even more epic than the great "Whipping Post," every member of the band brings something interresting to this Donovan original. It includes the greatest drum solo your ears have ever heard, as well as some of Duane's best guitar playing. Even if you don't like the Allman Brothers, you should still at least buy "One Way Out." It is one of the greatest blues covers ever performed by a band. Gregg's sings his best here and the interplay between Duane and Dickey makes you want to get up and strut your stuff. "Trouble No More" surpasses the original studio version. As for the last three, "Stand Back" is a very underrated funk number written by Berry Oakley with some fine lyrics and singing by Gregg (Note Duane's use of the slide as a horn section, very revolutionary.) "Blue Sky" is the album's poppiest song, but it's still a great number. If you are a country fan, you'll love this song. Duane and Dickey's harmony guitars are so beautiful. The last song is Duane's composition "Little Martha." A bitersweet song about his girlfriend, it makes you realise what the world had lost in that fateful bike crash. BUY THIS ALBUM!!!

Biography

Formed: 1969 in Macon, GA

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

The story of the Allman Brothers Band is one of triumph, tragedy, redemption, dissolution, and more redemption. Since their beginning in the late '60s, they went from being America's single most influential band to a shell of their former self trading on past glories, to...
Full Bio