10 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Edie Brickell isn’t a prolific artist. Her last solo CD, Volcano, was released in 2003. But there’s no rust on the extremely likable singer-songwriter. Her lush productions provide a suitable sonic bed for her to transmit her songs of general optimism. “They got a pill for that,” she sings during “Pill” and it sounds rather matter of fact, not the sign of anyone being addicted to a Mother’s Little Helper. “Give It Another Day” throws in a bouncy piano where she unites strains of Paul McCartney with Ben Folds Five. “2 O’Clock In the Morning” keeps a late-night quiet going on. “Always” allows her to shuffle down the avenue like she’s Mary Tyler Moore. “On the Avenue,” on the other hand, tucks inside a nightclub for a rhythmic exploration. Sunshine and optimism are her natural attributes and when she attempts to tackle a tune like “Bad Day,” it still doesn’t sound like anyone’s worst day, but a cloudy day in paradise.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Edie Brickell isn’t a prolific artist. Her last solo CD, Volcano, was released in 2003. But there’s no rust on the extremely likable singer-songwriter. Her lush productions provide a suitable sonic bed for her to transmit her songs of general optimism. “They got a pill for that,” she sings during “Pill” and it sounds rather matter of fact, not the sign of anyone being addicted to a Mother’s Little Helper. “Give It Another Day” throws in a bouncy piano where she unites strains of Paul McCartney with Ben Folds Five. “2 O’Clock In the Morning” keeps a late-night quiet going on. “Always” allows her to shuffle down the avenue like she’s Mary Tyler Moore. “On the Avenue,” on the other hand, tucks inside a nightclub for a rhythmic exploration. Sunshine and optimism are her natural attributes and when she attempts to tackle a tune like “Bad Day,” it still doesn’t sound like anyone’s worst day, but a cloudy day in paradise.

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