10 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though Julia Holter was part of a wave of young one-woman-band electronic artists to emerge in the early '10s, hers is a singular style. Her second album, Ekstasis, was one of 2012's most entrancing musical moments. Holter's eclectic background includes everything from folk to modern classical, and Ekstasis is similarly syncretic. Echoes of '80s pop, ambient electronics, chillwave/dream-pop, and more can be discerned echoing through its corridors, all informed by a willingness to move in experimental directions unbound by idiomatic constrictions. Holter's soft, clear voice coolly intones lyrics that seem alternately impressionistic and downright cubist. A gentle but insistent network of atmospheric synthesizer textures and understated electronic beats gleams, bubbles, and twinkles under and around Holter's vocals, for an effect that might be ataractic if its freedom from convention didn't keep commanding attention so consistently.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though Julia Holter was part of a wave of young one-woman-band electronic artists to emerge in the early '10s, hers is a singular style. Her second album, Ekstasis, was one of 2012's most entrancing musical moments. Holter's eclectic background includes everything from folk to modern classical, and Ekstasis is similarly syncretic. Echoes of '80s pop, ambient electronics, chillwave/dream-pop, and more can be discerned echoing through its corridors, all informed by a willingness to move in experimental directions unbound by idiomatic constrictions. Holter's soft, clear voice coolly intones lyrics that seem alternately impressionistic and downright cubist. A gentle but insistent network of atmospheric synthesizer textures and understated electronic beats gleams, bubbles, and twinkles under and around Holter's vocals, for an effect that might be ataractic if its freedom from convention didn't keep commanding attention so consistently.

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