16 Songs, 1 Hour 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Dino Saluzzi Group counts Argentinian bandoneon player Dino Saluzzi’s brother, son, and nephew among its members. Most of the music on their 2014 release El Valle de la Infancia is composed by Saluzzi, who draws from the musical traditions of Buenos Aires and is also influenced by the culture of northern Argentina, where he was born. “Sombras” starts with an impressionistic opening that resembles melodic free jazz. The piece moves through various sections colored by Saluzzi’s squeezebox, his brother Felix’s clarinet, and classical guitar. (Dino’s son Jose Maria and Nicolas Brizuela are the guitarists on the album.) “La Polvadera,” evoking dusty mystery, could accompany a reflective scene in a spaghetti western. The three-part “Pueblo” opens with “Labrador,” a solo guitar piece written and performed by Jose Maria. The second part, “Salavina” (by Mario Arnedo Gallo), and the last section, “La Tristecita” (by Ariel Ramirez), are both gorgeous and melancholy. Ramirez and Arnedo Gallo—late, great composers from northern Argentina—are well served here.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Dino Saluzzi Group counts Argentinian bandoneon player Dino Saluzzi’s brother, son, and nephew among its members. Most of the music on their 2014 release El Valle de la Infancia is composed by Saluzzi, who draws from the musical traditions of Buenos Aires and is also influenced by the culture of northern Argentina, where he was born. “Sombras” starts with an impressionistic opening that resembles melodic free jazz. The piece moves through various sections colored by Saluzzi’s squeezebox, his brother Felix’s clarinet, and classical guitar. (Dino’s son Jose Maria and Nicolas Brizuela are the guitarists on the album.) “La Polvadera,” evoking dusty mystery, could accompany a reflective scene in a spaghetti western. The three-part “Pueblo” opens with “Labrador,” a solo guitar piece written and performed by Jose Maria. The second part, “Salavina” (by Mario Arnedo Gallo), and the last section, “La Tristecita” (by Ariel Ramirez), are both gorgeous and melancholy. Ramirez and Arnedo Gallo—late, great composers from northern Argentina—are well served here.

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