13 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though Arcade Fire have always been comfortable making grand statements, they’ve also been generous with nuance. After joining forces with LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy on 2013’s Reflektor, the Canadian outfit bring in a similarly impressive crew of co-producers—Daft Punk’s Thomas Bangalter, Pulp’s Steve Mackey—for Everything Now, an album whose jaunty, disco-indebted art-rock is weighted with haunting takes on information overload (the ABBA-esque title track) and nostalgia (“Signs of Life”). “If you can’t see the forest for the trees, just burn it all down,” frontman Win Butler sings on “We Don’t Deserve Love,” a gorgeous yet disorienting ballad at the album’s conclusion. “And bring the ashes to me.”

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though Arcade Fire have always been comfortable making grand statements, they’ve also been generous with nuance. After joining forces with LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy on 2013’s Reflektor, the Canadian outfit bring in a similarly impressive crew of co-producers—Daft Punk’s Thomas Bangalter, Pulp’s Steve Mackey—for Everything Now, an album whose jaunty, disco-indebted art-rock is weighted with haunting takes on information overload (the ABBA-esque title track) and nostalgia (“Signs of Life”). “If you can’t see the forest for the trees, just burn it all down,” frontman Win Butler sings on “We Don’t Deserve Love,” a gorgeous yet disorienting ballad at the album’s conclusion. “And bring the ashes to me.”

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

3.6 out of 5
325 Ratings

325 Ratings

CCLIC22 ,

Okay

I Love Arcade Fire, but I find them to recently be a bit sanctimonious. The amount of innocent idealism has overshadowed the quality of the music.

Halik ,

Disappointing and Repetitive

AF is my favorite band but I find this album to be very lazy. I'm already looking forward to their next album hoping this is just a misstep.

Nosaintinla ,

Bell Bottomed BS

"Everything Now" is a song for Arcade Fire fans that wished that they were listening to ABBA or the Bee-Gees instead. You know, they're just walking around on platforms, wrapped in a leisure suit, wiping cocaine off their upperlips and just wishing that the Arcade Fire would make a disco song that they could do the Hustle to while trying not to get rug burn on their inner thighs from their unkempt pubic area. Love me some Arcade Fire, but this is a hard pass. I'm hoping that somewhere in the rest of this album is something non-disco loving AF fans can enjoy.

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