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Fire It Up

Kottonmouth Kings

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Album Review

In the 2004 post-9/11 world with America facing one of its most divided elections, the suburban kids need something less complex to rebel and scream about. Hip-hop's street-level thug life has been cabled into kid's bedrooms, so Footloose-styled rebellion is out of the question and labeling Avril Lavigne "punk" hasn't fooled all of them. Times are perfect for the Kottonmouth Kings, and as they should, adults with "taste" dismiss them as crap. It's something the Kings wear as a badge on Fire It Up, another album that gives the finger to nonbelievers. This time the finger comes with an extra helping of hip-hop and less of the garbage punk the Kings used to fill half of their albums with. The punk parts are short and the hip-hop — more fan boy than authentic — is as sticky and dank as what's in the band's Baggies. Speaking of which, this is one of the least weed-oriented albums from the band. Instead, the Kings focus on building the ICP-style cult and their cottage industry, Suburban Noize Records. When the bandmembers infer they're spearheading a street-level revolution, it's hard to take, but no doubt there's a ton of heart on the record. Respect them for giving it up to the fans and it gets easier to ignore their shortcomings. The production is better than ever and "Bring It On" should place in the band's top three songs of all time. Borrow a teenager's iPod, turn it up loud, and party like the the Beasties never went to Tibet. Hurry up, before someone skateboards by and gives you the finger.

Customer Reviews

Great Album, iTunes?!?! Partial Album?!?!

This is a great KMK selection, in the overall sense. Fire It Up is a good all around album, it has some great sit back and chill tunes, and it has some of the harder and faster stuff (not my style...) and it's got a good political message. iTunes really dropped the ball, I bought this album a year ago in a store and aside from screwing up the track names, what you see is not the partial album, ITS THE WHOLE ALBUM! The CD came with a bonus DVD, but theres no way they could include all of those music video's, etc. that was on it....

People like this music? How is that possible?

It's noise, with words about how weed is great thrown in for good measure. That about sums up the entire KMK out put. It's unbelievable that there are enough idiots out there to support a band of talentless beach bum pot heads. Sad.

If you have an iphone here's what to do to avoid this crap

1. Go to Settings – General – Restrictions.

2. Click on Enable and you will be prompted to setup a four digit passcode. Set it and confirm it and the Restriction options will become available. Be sure to use a passcode that your kids won’t guess or is obvious.

3. Now you can set your Restrictions.

Biography

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Self-described "psychedelic hip-hop punk rock" outfit the Kottonmouth Kings emerged from Orange County, California, in 1994. Comprised of former Humble Gods frontman Brad Daddy X, rappers Saint Vicious and D-Loc, DJ Bobby B, and "visual assassin" Pakelika, the group first attracted attention with the track "Suburban Life," which appeared on the soundtrack to the film Scream 2 and became a modern rock radio hit. After issuing an EP, Stoners Reeking Havoc, on their own Suburban Noize label in early...
Full Bio
Fire It Up, Kottonmouth Kings
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