10 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Cate Le Bon’s sophomore album, the Welsh chanteuse approximates the vintage vinyl in her record collection with songs that collage old tones and artful psychedelia alongside an abstract take on baroque pop. The quirky, analog-scrambled “Falcon Eyed” opens like Nico singing for The United States of America. Muted vocals coo reservedly over pre-punk rhythms as a hypnotic mantra of Moog tones keep up with the pace of a Velvet Underground–derived guitar jangle. It sounds like source inspiration for Stereolab and Broadcast—bands that came before Le Bon. Her equally demure approach to “Puts Me to Work” is matched by antiquated parlor piano, but here the grit and grime of those VU influences gets wrapped in a comforting, pastoral Welsh blanket that has more in common with 2001’s The Blue Trees by Gorky's Zygotic Mynci (also from Wales). In the angular title track, the vintage guitars play through dirty and distorted fuzz. Le Bon finds her voice in “Fold the Cloth,” where her fetching falsetto soars over what sounds like an outtake from Dungen’s Ta Det Lugnt.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Cate Le Bon’s sophomore album, the Welsh chanteuse approximates the vintage vinyl in her record collection with songs that collage old tones and artful psychedelia alongside an abstract take on baroque pop. The quirky, analog-scrambled “Falcon Eyed” opens like Nico singing for The United States of America. Muted vocals coo reservedly over pre-punk rhythms as a hypnotic mantra of Moog tones keep up with the pace of a Velvet Underground–derived guitar jangle. It sounds like source inspiration for Stereolab and Broadcast—bands that came before Le Bon. Her equally demure approach to “Puts Me to Work” is matched by antiquated parlor piano, but here the grit and grime of those VU influences gets wrapped in a comforting, pastoral Welsh blanket that has more in common with 2001’s The Blue Trees by Gorky's Zygotic Mynci (also from Wales). In the angular title track, the vintage guitars play through dirty and distorted fuzz. Le Bon finds her voice in “Fold the Cloth,” where her fetching falsetto soars over what sounds like an outtake from Dungen’s Ta Det Lugnt.

TITLE TIME
2:48
3:29
3:05
3:23
3:36
5:39
3:08
3:07
3:52
2:59

About Cate Le Bon

Cardiff, Wales native Cate Le Bon matched her slightly spooky, fragile voice with dark lyrics -- she confessed to being death-fixated -- and a sparse, spindly guitar sound. In 2007, she opened for Super Furry Animals' Gruff Rhys, with whom she occasionally collaborated, during a tour of the U.K. That same year, she self-released her first single, "No One Can Drag Me Down"/"Disappear," and recorded an album, Pet Deaths, which was shelved. Edrych yn Llygaid Ceffyl Benthyg, a Welsh-language EP, was issued on Peski in 2008, the same year she contributed vocals to "I Lust U," a song from Rhys and Bryan Hollon's Neon Neon album Stainless Style. Me Oh My, Le Bon's first album to actually be released, came out on Rhys' Irony Bored label in 2009 and was hotly tipped by Uncut magazine. Her sophomore release, Cyrk, which paired the spooky, folk-tinged timbre of Nico with the experimental, Nuggets-meets-Krautrock attack of Os Mutantes and Faust, arrived in early 2012. Arriving in 2013, the well-received Mug Museum saw Le Bon relocating to Los Angeles, and featured a guest appearance from Perfume Genius on the track "I Think I Knew." Hermits on Holiday, a collaboration with American singer/songwriter Tim Presley under the moniker DRINKS, arrived in 2015, followed by an all-new studio album, Crab Day, in early 2016. ~ Andy Kellman

  • ORIGIN
    Penboyr, West Wales

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