15 Songs, 1 Hour, 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Myriad’s approach to Christian alt-rock favors atmosphere over evangelism. With Arrows, With Poise, the Seattle band’s second album, uses indirection to drive home its points about spiritual blindness and the imminent presence of the divine. Front man Jeremy Edwardson sings with an insinuating croon that mocks the material world while hinting at his own nagging fears. Vague threats and unsettled emotions hang over “Grandfather Clock,” “Throwing Punches,” “Stuck in a Glass Elevator,” and similar tracks. Though the mood never quite gets sunny, songs like “A Thousand Winters Melting,” “The Holiest of Thieves,” and “Better than the Rest” offer hopeful glimpses of a higher world. Love — both mortal and otherwise — makes its presence known in the sleekly-contoured “A Clean Shot.” Spiky lead guitar and shimmering keyboards define the album’s sound, suggesting a blend of Radiohead, Mutemath, and the more angular aspects of Coldplay. Funky yet furtive grooves lend a disquieting twitch to “Polar Bears and Shark Fins” and “Forget What You Came For.” With Arrows, With Poise is a work of uneasy exaltation and fog-shrouded faith.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Myriad’s approach to Christian alt-rock favors atmosphere over evangelism. With Arrows, With Poise, the Seattle band’s second album, uses indirection to drive home its points about spiritual blindness and the imminent presence of the divine. Front man Jeremy Edwardson sings with an insinuating croon that mocks the material world while hinting at his own nagging fears. Vague threats and unsettled emotions hang over “Grandfather Clock,” “Throwing Punches,” “Stuck in a Glass Elevator,” and similar tracks. Though the mood never quite gets sunny, songs like “A Thousand Winters Melting,” “The Holiest of Thieves,” and “Better than the Rest” offer hopeful glimpses of a higher world. Love — both mortal and otherwise — makes its presence known in the sleekly-contoured “A Clean Shot.” Spiky lead guitar and shimmering keyboards define the album’s sound, suggesting a blend of Radiohead, Mutemath, and the more angular aspects of Coldplay. Funky yet furtive grooves lend a disquieting twitch to “Polar Bears and Shark Fins” and “Forget What You Came For.” With Arrows, With Poise is a work of uneasy exaltation and fog-shrouded faith.

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About The Myriad

Taking cues from Muse, Coldplay, and even the Bravery, Seattle alt-rock outfit the Myriad began with university students Jeremy Edwardson and John Roger Schofield. Determined to start a band in which all members had equal artistic input, the duo recruited Randy Miller, Jonathan Young, and Steven Tracy to join them in the endeavor. Their debut album, You Can't Trust a Ladder, was released in 2005. The Myriad's biggest boost came in December 2007, when the band won MTV2's Dew Circuit Breakout competition. Their video for "A Clear Shot" began rotation on the network in January 2008, the same year that their second album, With Arrows, With Poise, was released on Koch Records. ~ Katherine Fulton

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