14 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Roots have wandered down a multitude of stylistic pathways during their decade and a half long career, they've always maintained a clear and uncompromising aesthetic focus. From the expansive, organic jams of Do You Want More?!!!??!, to the more concise classicism of Things Fall Apart, to the sprawling, boldly progressive Phrenology, The Roots have stayed true to their principles of restless musical experimentation, and fiercely interrogatory, politically minded lyricism. Game Theory, The Roots’ eighth LP and their first release for Def Jam, sees Black Thought, ?uestlove and the rest of the crew continuing to refine their souled-out sound. In standout track “Take It There” a reinvigorated Black Thought rails against the development of a surveillance society, his verses surging forward on a wave of trickily syncopated live beats, while lead single “Don’t Feel Right” is an outraged slice of 21st century soul, embellished by the ominous reverberations of an abused piano. Game Theory finds The Roots galvanized by a newfound sense of political urgency, and by a welcome surfeit of musical inspiration.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Roots have wandered down a multitude of stylistic pathways during their decade and a half long career, they've always maintained a clear and uncompromising aesthetic focus. From the expansive, organic jams of Do You Want More?!!!??!, to the more concise classicism of Things Fall Apart, to the sprawling, boldly progressive Phrenology, The Roots have stayed true to their principles of restless musical experimentation, and fiercely interrogatory, politically minded lyricism. Game Theory, The Roots’ eighth LP and their first release for Def Jam, sees Black Thought, ?uestlove and the rest of the crew continuing to refine their souled-out sound. In standout track “Take It There” a reinvigorated Black Thought rails against the development of a surveillance society, his verses surging forward on a wave of trickily syncopated live beats, while lead single “Don’t Feel Right” is an outraged slice of 21st century soul, embellished by the ominous reverberations of an abused piano. Game Theory finds The Roots galvanized by a newfound sense of political urgency, and by a welcome surfeit of musical inspiration.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
277 Ratings
277 Ratings
El Consumo ,

Hey Yung Joc

Put this in your CD player and listen to what Hip Hop is supposed to sound like

geo4666 ,

Best Rap I've Heard

I hardly listen to rap music, other then the occasional Kanye West and Dead Prez. After countless reccomendations from my friend, a huge fan of The Roots: Things Fall Apart, I heard the new single, thought it was awesome, and bought this CD. The lyrics, music, and the atmosphere of the album as a whole is just awesome. It's a refreshing change to hear a rap group that plays instruments as the majority of their "beats" and they are actually damn good musicians. Each song perfectly flows into the next, which makes listening to "Game Theory" an awesome experience.

L Sims ,

Illadelph's Finest Strikes Again

The Roots finally release their long-awaited Def Jam debut (don't get it twisted - they're 19 years deep in the game), and all us OkayPlayers are NOT disappointed by the outcome. The Legendary has released another A+ album in the vein of "Things Fall Apart". Simply put, this is an album chock-full of beautiful music - one listen to the James "J-Dilla" Yancey tribute "Can't Stop This" is further proof that The Roots are musical pioneers, as was the great Dilla. From "False Media" and its scorching political commentary to "Bread And Butter" and its soulful, Negro spiritual feel, "Game Theory" is a winner.

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