14 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The problem with most political rappers is that they frequently alienate themselves from their audience by criticizing fellow rappers and talking down to them. The Coup’s Genocide & Juice took the opposite tact, as group leader Boots Riley included Bay Area gangsta rappers like Spice-1 and E-40 in his juicy criticisms of the capitalist system. “Hip 2 tha Skeme,” “Fat Cats, Bigga Fish,” and “The Name Game” refuse to differentiate between street culture and revolutionary theory. Within a few years rappers would be openly idolizing CEOs, but the sidesplitting and scathing “Pimps (Free Stylin’ at the Fortune 500)” is a more persuasive take on corporate culture.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The problem with most political rappers is that they frequently alienate themselves from their audience by criticizing fellow rappers and talking down to them. The Coup’s Genocide & Juice took the opposite tact, as group leader Boots Riley included Bay Area gangsta rappers like Spice-1 and E-40 in his juicy criticisms of the capitalist system. “Hip 2 tha Skeme,” “Fat Cats, Bigga Fish,” and “The Name Game” refuse to differentiate between street culture and revolutionary theory. Within a few years rappers would be openly idolizing CEOs, but the sidesplitting and scathing “Pimps (Free Stylin’ at the Fortune 500)” is a more persuasive take on corporate culture.

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