20 Songs, 1 Hour 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Sean Paul isn’t the first dancehall reggae artist to infiltrate pop and hip-hop, but he’s the only one to reach a level of ubiquity that makes him one of his era’s biggest U.S. names. Dutty Rock, his second album, is the onw that put him over. Hard beat-knocking tracks such as “Get Busy” and “Like Glue,” along with the relatively calmer “Ganja Breed,” portray the toaster as an everywhere-at-once nightlife denizen, keeping both eyes on the booty even as he sparks up with his fellow hardmen. He’s not scared of decelerating for lilting sweet-talkers like “I’m Still in Love With You,” a duet with Sasha that gave his softer edges a radio hearing. Paul’s insistent flow, along with his many producers’ ear-grabbing variations on the basic rhythms, make Dutty Rock both emblematic of and unique in its cultural moment.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Sean Paul isn’t the first dancehall reggae artist to infiltrate pop and hip-hop, but he’s the only one to reach a level of ubiquity that makes him one of his era’s biggest U.S. names. Dutty Rock, his second album, is the onw that put him over. Hard beat-knocking tracks such as “Get Busy” and “Like Glue,” along with the relatively calmer “Ganja Breed,” portray the toaster as an everywhere-at-once nightlife denizen, keeping both eyes on the booty even as he sparks up with his fellow hardmen. He’s not scared of decelerating for lilting sweet-talkers like “I’m Still in Love With You,” a duet with Sasha that gave his softer edges a radio hearing. Paul’s insistent flow, along with his many producers’ ear-grabbing variations on the basic rhythms, make Dutty Rock both emblematic of and unique in its cultural moment.

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