10 Songs, 1 Hour, 4 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On Good News, Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters pay tribute to Sam Cooke’s seminal 1964 album Ain’t That Good News with a set that runs the gamut from caressing to ferocious. Earl builds on his reputation as a virtuosic blues player while delving into gospel, R&B, and rockabilly, honoring Cooke’s legacy of soulful idealism in the process. Joined by guest guitarists Nicholas Tabarias and Zach Zunis as well as singer Diane Blue, The Broadcasters display both grit and refinement in these tracks. “I Met Her on That Train” launches the album in fine style with a rollicking reworking of Junior Parker’s “Mystery Train.” Earl matches Blue’s tender vocal on Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come” with luminous guitar lines, augmented by Dave Lumina’s vivid keyboards. Dreamy extended pieces like “In the Wee Hours” and “Blues for Henry” give the band plenty of elbow room instrumentally, while the gospelized title track and the blues-drenched “Puddin’ Pie” inject some swagger into the proceedings. The closing track, “Running in Peace”—a salute to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing—circles back to the album’s central themes of hope, healing, and transcendence.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On Good News, Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters pay tribute to Sam Cooke’s seminal 1964 album Ain’t That Good News with a set that runs the gamut from caressing to ferocious. Earl builds on his reputation as a virtuosic blues player while delving into gospel, R&B, and rockabilly, honoring Cooke’s legacy of soulful idealism in the process. Joined by guest guitarists Nicholas Tabarias and Zach Zunis as well as singer Diane Blue, The Broadcasters display both grit and refinement in these tracks. “I Met Her on That Train” launches the album in fine style with a rollicking reworking of Junior Parker’s “Mystery Train.” Earl matches Blue’s tender vocal on Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come” with luminous guitar lines, augmented by Dave Lumina’s vivid keyboards. Dreamy extended pieces like “In the Wee Hours” and “Blues for Henry” give the band plenty of elbow room instrumentally, while the gospelized title track and the blues-drenched “Puddin’ Pie” inject some swagger into the proceedings. The closing track, “Running in Peace”—a salute to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing—circles back to the album’s central themes of hope, healing, and transcendence.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5

21 Ratings
21 Ratings

Good news indeed!

Steve Likens

I did not think it was possible for Ronnie Earl to play with any more intensity, passion, and soul than he poured out on Hope Radio and Just for Today. "In the Wee Hours" proves me wrong - very wrong. And that's good news indeed!

Guitar genius

RFeury

Another great Ronnie Earl Album! One of the world’s greatest jazz & blues guitarists. Why isn’t he famous!?!?! See him live sometime if he’s in your area. You’ll be treated to several hours of stream of consciousness guitar brilliance. The notes just seem to flow, with never a pause to find the right note or phrasing. Buy this CD!

Ronnie Earl Strikes Again

stan25

I have most of Ronnie Earl’s collection of fine albums. This one is right up there with the older and more classic albums. A real gem. What I like about this particular album is the Hammond B-3 accompaniment. That sets this album apart from the others that I have

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