13 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Grey Britain is the U.K. hardcore punk quintet’s response to current-day greed and racism, delivered with mouth-frothing ferocity. It’s true that the unlikely use of strings on “Vulture (Act I)” and “Misery” adds some embroidery to the pervasive sturm und drang, but really, Grey Britain can best be seen as a conceptual successor to the Clash’s London Calling and similarly politically minded punk discs of the ‘80s. Singer Frank Carter is unrelenting in his indictment of his nation’s ills, bellowing his way through “Leeches,” “Death Voices,” “Queensberry Rules” and “Crucif**ks” with righteous rage. The tongue-lashing he gives St. Peter during “The Great Forgiver” is a highpoint. The shout-along choruses to “London Is the Reason” and “I Dread the Night” invite the alienated everywhere to join in the struggle. Under the production guidance of GGGarth Richardson, the tracks seethe, slash and even swing, especially on the maniacal boogie tune “Graves.” Brutal and sporadically brilliant, Grey Britain burns white-hot from first cut to last.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Grey Britain is the U.K. hardcore punk quintet’s response to current-day greed and racism, delivered with mouth-frothing ferocity. It’s true that the unlikely use of strings on “Vulture (Act I)” and “Misery” adds some embroidery to the pervasive sturm und drang, but really, Grey Britain can best be seen as a conceptual successor to the Clash’s London Calling and similarly politically minded punk discs of the ‘80s. Singer Frank Carter is unrelenting in his indictment of his nation’s ills, bellowing his way through “Leeches,” “Death Voices,” “Queensberry Rules” and “Crucif**ks” with righteous rage. The tongue-lashing he gives St. Peter during “The Great Forgiver” is a highpoint. The shout-along choruses to “London Is the Reason” and “I Dread the Night” invite the alienated everywhere to join in the struggle. Under the production guidance of GGGarth Richardson, the tracks seethe, slash and even swing, especially on the maniacal boogie tune “Graves.” Brutal and sporadically brilliant, Grey Britain burns white-hot from first cut to last.

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About Gallows

As a disenfranchised D.I.Y. punk band from the U.K., Gallows fuse rage with a disgust with their social surroundings in the same fashion as their forefathers, the Sex Pistols and the Clash, to add a genuine urgency to their punk revival. In 2005, Frank Carter (vocals), Steph Carter (guitar/vocals), Laurent Barnard (guitars/keys/vocals), Stuart Gili-Ross (bass), and Lee Barratt (drums) formed the band after digesting a steady diet of '80s hardcore staples like Black Flag and Minor Threat and underground bands like Swing Kids and JR Ewing. Frank Carter attacks his songs with an unforced intense venomous scream while confronting perilous topics like date rape, street violence, and simmering anxieties boiling within. Gallows made their debut album, Orchestra of Wolves, on a minimal budget in September 2006 after signing to the Nottingham label In at the Deep End Records. In March 2007, shortly after a SXSW gig in Austin, Gallows secured a record deal with Epitaph Records, which made plans to re-release the band's first album, with three bonus tracks, on North American soil that July. Two years later, the band returned with its sophomore album, Grey Britain. In 2011, the band announced it had parted ways with singer Carter. He was soon replaced by Alexisonfire's Wade MacNeil who made his debut on the band's eponymous third studio album in 2012. Continuing to evolve, Gallows stripped back to raw garage punk sound for their fourth album 2015's Desolation Sounds. ~ Jason Lymangrover

ORIGIN
Watford, England
FORMED
2005

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