11 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unabashed Blondie fans with muted guitars and jacked up synths? A new Abba for the New Millennium hipster? Cool, sassy, Londoners making cool, sassy dance music? All of the above! Although sleeker and not quite as edgy as fellow dance-punk bands LCD, !!! or CSS (or first wave dance-punkers Gang of Four, ESG or Delta 5, for that matter), NYPC unquestionably shares the bloodline of those groups. You get the feeling that Pony Club’s DNA strands are linked by a chain of little disco balls, rather than safety pins and stale, sticky beer. Tahita Bulmer’s detached, botox'd vocal delivery has precious little variation and an excess of attitude, capable of merciless teasing (“I can make you ice cream”) and a rather bored bemusement (“No romantic pedigree; Suck me in and spit me out”). Standouts include, of course, “Ice Cream” (strong enough to survive being released two years before Fantastic Playroom); “Get Lucky” and “Hiding on the Staircase,” both impeccable interpretations of disco with punk flavors, and some great guitars-as-percussion on the former track; “F.A.N.,” which has a reverential “Rapture” vibe (the Blondie song, not the band); and the moody and seductive “Get Go,” with its reverb and fuzzy guitars. Whether you call it electroclash, dance-punk, or new wave revival, NYPC is one club that may become a habit.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unabashed Blondie fans with muted guitars and jacked up synths? A new Abba for the New Millennium hipster? Cool, sassy, Londoners making cool, sassy dance music? All of the above! Although sleeker and not quite as edgy as fellow dance-punk bands LCD, !!! or CSS (or first wave dance-punkers Gang of Four, ESG or Delta 5, for that matter), NYPC unquestionably shares the bloodline of those groups. You get the feeling that Pony Club’s DNA strands are linked by a chain of little disco balls, rather than safety pins and stale, sticky beer. Tahita Bulmer’s detached, botox'd vocal delivery has precious little variation and an excess of attitude, capable of merciless teasing (“I can make you ice cream”) and a rather bored bemusement (“No romantic pedigree; Suck me in and spit me out”). Standouts include, of course, “Ice Cream” (strong enough to survive being released two years before Fantastic Playroom); “Get Lucky” and “Hiding on the Staircase,” both impeccable interpretations of disco with punk flavors, and some great guitars-as-percussion on the former track; “F.A.N.,” which has a reverential “Rapture” vibe (the Blondie song, not the band); and the moody and seductive “Get Go,” with its reverb and fuzzy guitars. Whether you call it electroclash, dance-punk, or new wave revival, NYPC is one club that may become a habit.

TITLE TIME
3:43
3:31
3:12
4:19
4:07
4:29
4:03
4:13
3:35
3:55
4:57

About New Young Pony Club

The London dance-rock group New Young Pony Club initially featured Tahita Bulmer (vocals), Andy Spence (guitar), Igor Volk (bass), Lou Hayter (keyboards), and Sarah Jones (drums). Inspired by LCD Soundsystem, the Stranglers, and Gang of Four, the band arrived with the release of the Ice Cream 7" in February 2005. The limited-edition pressing of 1,000 copies sold out in just three days, fueling New Young Pony Club's growing popularity among the U.K. music press and chic blogs. A deal with Modular Recordings, home to Wolfmother, the Avalanches, and Van She, and a second single, "The Get Go," followed before the year's end, but NYPC was still aiming to break overseas. They got it when their biggest U.K. hit, "Ice Cream," was featured in the Intel Core 2 Duo television commercial in fall 2006. U.K. tour dates supporting Lily Allen followed in November. Fantastic Playroom, the group's first album, finally surfaced in 2007. Even considering the band's extensive subsequent touring, the wait for their second album, The Optimist, was a lengthy one; it was issued in 2010. ~ MacKenzie Wilson

  • ORIGIN
    London, England
  • GENRE
    Pop
  • FORMED
    2004

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