15 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Even before he departed his vaunted Talking Heads in the late '80s, David Byrne had already embarked upon a solo career that encompassed various stage projects (The Catherine Wheel, The Knee Plays, The Forest) and film soundtracks (True Stories, Last Emperor) . But this 2004 release finds Byrne bristling with a sense of ambitious eclecticism rare even by his own elevated standards, a sensibility that carries Byrne deeper into the classical realm than he's ever been. Austin, Texas' chamber outfit the Tosca Strings inform the melancholy, post-modernist opener "Glass, Concrete & Stone," the limber 'n' loopy rap fusion "Tiny Apocalypse," and "Un Di Felice, Eterea," aria adaptations from Verdi's La Traviata. That operatic fixation surfaces early on in a lovely, if unlikely duet with Rufus Wainwright on "Au Fond du Temple Saint," adapted from Bizet's The Pearl Fishers.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Even before he departed his vaunted Talking Heads in the late '80s, David Byrne had already embarked upon a solo career that encompassed various stage projects (The Catherine Wheel, The Knee Plays, The Forest) and film soundtracks (True Stories, Last Emperor) . But this 2004 release finds Byrne bristling with a sense of ambitious eclecticism rare even by his own elevated standards, a sensibility that carries Byrne deeper into the classical realm than he's ever been. Austin, Texas' chamber outfit the Tosca Strings inform the melancholy, post-modernist opener "Glass, Concrete & Stone," the limber 'n' loopy rap fusion "Tiny Apocalypse," and "Un Di Felice, Eterea," aria adaptations from Verdi's La Traviata. That operatic fixation surfaces early on in a lovely, if unlikely duet with Rufus Wainwright on "Au Fond du Temple Saint," adapted from Bizet's The Pearl Fishers.

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