Hammer Down by The SteelDrivers on Apple Music

10 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Even with two of the band’s founding members having parted ways, Hammer Down resonates with a noticeable progression in comparison to The SteelDrivers' preceding album, Reckless. New guitarist Gary Nichols co-penned the opening “Shallow Grave,” an unsettling yet harmonious murder ballad that (with some help from Tammy Rogers’ classic fiddle playing) is the most traditional-sounding tune here. On the following “How Long Have I Been Your Fool,” we’re reminded that The SteelDrivers comprise some of Nashville’s A-list session players. With Rogers cementing three-part harmonies that have more in common with Fleetwood Mac than The Cox Family, the song shares some DNA with Little Big Town. Even Brent Truitt’s mandolin parts here play with the progressive dexterity of Nickel Creek–era Chris Thile. Although The SteelDrivers' approach to musicianship and singing strays from the traditional string-band blueprint, songs like “When You Don’t Come Home” and “Cry No Mississippi” retain the genre’s tendency to contrast melancholy subject matter with uplifting melodies.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Even with two of the band’s founding members having parted ways, Hammer Down resonates with a noticeable progression in comparison to The SteelDrivers' preceding album, Reckless. New guitarist Gary Nichols co-penned the opening “Shallow Grave,” an unsettling yet harmonious murder ballad that (with some help from Tammy Rogers’ classic fiddle playing) is the most traditional-sounding tune here. On the following “How Long Have I Been Your Fool,” we’re reminded that The SteelDrivers comprise some of Nashville’s A-list session players. With Rogers cementing three-part harmonies that have more in common with Fleetwood Mac than The Cox Family, the song shares some DNA with Little Big Town. Even Brent Truitt’s mandolin parts here play with the progressive dexterity of Nickel Creek–era Chris Thile. Although The SteelDrivers' approach to musicianship and singing strays from the traditional string-band blueprint, songs like “When You Don’t Come Home” and “Cry No Mississippi” retain the genre’s tendency to contrast melancholy subject matter with uplifting melodies.

TITLE TIME
2:54
3:26
3:01
3:56
3:24
3:24
4:31
2:52
4:05
3:01

About The SteelDrivers

Specializing in a unique mix of what might be called bluegrass soul, the SteelDrivers have featured a group of veteran Nashville session players including Richard Bailey on banjo, Mike Fleming on bass, Mike Henderson on mandolin, Tammy Rogers on fiddle, and Chris Stapleton on guitar and lead vocals. Stapleton's bluesy, hoarse, and Tom Waits-like singing really set the SteelDrivers apart in the often generic contemporary bluegrass genre, where a high and lonesome tenor lead vocal is typically heard. Stapleton's passionate croaking gave the SteelDrivers an authentic, aged, and rootsy feel. The band quickly became a favorite on the bluegrass festival circuit and released a debut album, simply called The SteelDrivers and consisting of all original compositions, on Rounder Records early in 2008. A second Rounder release, Reckless, appeared in 2010. Before recording their next album, the SteelDrivers went through some major lineup shifts, with Stapleton and Henderson both leaving. They were replaced by Gary Nichols and Brent Truitt, respectively, and their next album, 2013's Hammer Down, couldn't help but sound different. Nichols proved to be a fine replacement, though, and the band kept rolling along. The SteelDrivers dug deeper into their soulful side on 2015's The Muscle Shoals Recordings, recorded in the Alabama town where some of the biggest and best R&B hits of the '60s and '70s were cut. The album also featured singer and songwriter Jason Isbell on two songs. ~ Steve Leggett

  • ORIGIN
    Nashville, TN
  • FORMED
    2005

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