15 Songs, 1 Hour, 6 Minutes


Ratings and Reviews

2.4 out of 5

387 Ratings

387 Ratings

Not Bad


I mean lIke theres 4 good songs so that qualifies to buy a cd right

Hurricane Chris-51/50 Ratchet


Shreveport, Louisiana bred Hurricane Chris blasted on the scene similar to how Soulja Boy did. With his club hit that got the whole world chanting "A Bay Bay", wether hated or loved, it was catchy and everyone knew Hurricane. Bringing his ratchet movement, here is his debut.

Getting Money: Rising synths and a soulful hook from Nicole Wray create the epic and dramatic introduction to 51/50. Fitting intro that is focused, held back only by the weak subject matter and Chris' singing part. 3/5
A Bay Bay: Phunk Dawg produced club hit "A Bay Bay" is a reference to famous Shreveport DJ Hollywood Bay Bay. The chant became a ghetto term for "a baby", nevertheless the whole world heard the track and it became a success. From the booming bass, synth line and synth plucks, Hurricane's lyrics aren't that great. Its enjoyable to the club goers, but mainly popular due to catchiness. 3.5/5
Doin My Thang: Average production, the repetitive hook is a little annoying, as Hurricane brags about he does his thang. References to his dancing "doin the Rick James" and how fly he is, it was only decent. Big Poppa adds to the hype of this club hitter. 2.5/5
New Fashion: Hard hitting piano keys/drums and hyper shrieks of synths make this a nice production. Weak hook, the track wasn't that great other than the beat with menacing threats. 2.5/5
The Hand Clap: Big Poppa & Hollywood Bay Bay add to the hype of this club hit, the second single. The hook is wickedly catchy similar to "A Bay Bay" with a clap production and synths. Lyrically it has some humor, but pretty weak. 3.5/5
Walk Like That: Similar production to the previous cuts, Hurricane has another catchy hook, however it isn't as appealing. Bouncy synths and Hurricane's random raps, make a decent club track. 2/5
Touch Me: A slower tempod track with a horrible hook, of a bland "touch me" from a random girl, the hook was weak. A sex track that was pretty boring, it had decent production, that has a little groove to it. 2.5/5
Leaving You: After the sex track, Hurricane sings a bad hook of "I'm leeeeaavinnng youuu", production was average. Lyrically it was decent, and fits with the beat. 3/5
Do Something: Another threatening track, less menacing as "New Fashion", a paranoid and stressed Hurricane spits over a repetitive loop of synths. 2.5/5
Bang: I wasn't feelin the beat, as Big Poppa appears again, with Hurricane for this trumpet filled production. Weak hook. 1.5/5
Beat In My Trunk: Catchy hook that works better than the previous 3-4 tracks, the synth, snares and piano line make a trunk bangin track. It was decent, at times boring though. 3/5
Playas Rock: Boxie assists some soulfulness to the hook, since Hurricane isn't that good at crooning with production. Similar to Soulja Boy's "Soulja Girl" it is the only cut on the album that is different. Much better than Soulja Boy's track, Hurricane has some Twista like flow on this. 3/5
Momma: Nicole Wray appears again for another focused track about Hurricane's momma. Production was only average, decent hook, Wray's crooning is not necessary though. Decent. 2.5/5
A Bay Bay (Ratchet Remix): Personally I enjoyed the remix a lot better than the original, Hurricane's verse is much better with a sped up flow. The Game drops a solid appearance, south hit Lil Boosie contributes nicely because he fits, Baby was decent, E-40 is a little out of place, Lava House artist Angie Locc wasn't bad, and Jadakiss drops a good verse. 4.5/5
The Workout: Decent beat that is meant for the club as well as the track, talking about dancing in the club as a workout. Not that great, that's why its a bonus. 2/5

Overall I was slightly impressed by Hurricane's debut. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be and is much better than Soulja Boy's debut. Those looking for lyrical prowess, will not find it here, this isn't for you. This is for the club goers who like to party, dance, etc. "A Bay Bay" and "The Hand Clap" are extremely catchy, as well as "Beat In My Trunk" and "Doin My Thang". Didn't care for "New Fashion", "Walk Like That", "Touch Me" and "Bang", all of which either had boring productions, weak subject matter or weak hooks. "Leaving You" isn't bad, except for the poor hook and "Playas Rock" isn't as corny as "Soulja Girl", as well as showing Hurricane's sped up rap. "Momma" falls into mediocracy, along with "The Workout", however "Getting Money" is a great intro. Similar to hyphy music, snap music, crunk music, Hurricane introduces Louisiana's ratchet music. He is a lot more talented than some of those artists, much better than Soulja Boy, but still has a great deal of work to do. Less than decent debut, that has its moments, but lacks some hooks, subject matter and has some mediocre tracks. This is hip hop's section for fun, so I understand if those looking for lyrics are saying this isn't rap, but its club fun that has a few decent tracks, decent south debut. A solid start, that needs a little polishing to become a southern hit.
Rating 5/10

just stop


hurricane chris is an inspiration to me if a guy like him can get a recording deal with songs like his so can i

About Hurricane Chris

Rapping since he was just nine years old, Shreveport, LA's Hurricane Chris burst onto the national scene in 2007 with his catchy single "A Bay Bay." After gaining some local attention with his indie singles "Ya Hear Me" and "Yep" along with some mixtape appearances, Hurricane Chris caught local legend DJ Hollyhood Bay Bay being welcomed at a club with the audience chanting "Hey Bay Bay!" Hollyhood was a leader of Shreveport's ratchet movement -- Shreveport's version of crunk or hyphy -- of which Chris was already a member, having joined the Lava House promotion crew and record label, based in the infamous Cedar Grove neighborhood. As Lava House was releasing the successful singles "Ratchet" and then the "Ratchet" remix with Lil' Boosie, Chris was transforming the chant he heard into a saying, "A Bay Bay," which became the Shreveport version of "fo sho." The saying turned into a Lava House single and caught the ear of Atlanta's Mr. Collipark. Thanks to Collipark, the now 18-year-old Hurricane Chris signed a deal with J Records in 2007. His debut album, 51/50 Ratchet, appeared late that year. ~ David Jeffries




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