16 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jack Bruce’s third solo album is a relentlessly eclectic affair that veers from vigorous progressive rock workouts to brooding jazz balladry and odd acoustic folk pieces. The ex-Cream bassist binds 1971's Harmony Row together with bluesy vocals that can sound droll, yearning, or ominous (sometimes simultaneously). Introspective, piano-centered pieces like “Can You Follow?” and “Victoria Sage” offer contrast to rippling, multilayered electric numbers like “You Burned the Tables on Me” and “Smiles and Grins.” A track like “Post War” (featuring Chris Spedding’s incisive guitar work) shows Bruce’s willingness to both embrace and subvert conventional pop/rock songwriting.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jack Bruce’s third solo album is a relentlessly eclectic affair that veers from vigorous progressive rock workouts to brooding jazz balladry and odd acoustic folk pieces. The ex-Cream bassist binds 1971's Harmony Row together with bluesy vocals that can sound droll, yearning, or ominous (sometimes simultaneously). Introspective, piano-centered pieces like “Can You Follow?” and “Victoria Sage” offer contrast to rippling, multilayered electric numbers like “You Burned the Tables on Me” and “Smiles and Grins.” A track like “Post War” (featuring Chris Spedding’s incisive guitar work) shows Bruce’s willingness to both embrace and subvert conventional pop/rock songwriting.

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