8 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

When Ozzy Osbourne left Black Sabbath in 1979, a significant slice of their audience figured the end had come. So the sheer physical force of their first album fronted by Elf and Rainbow alumnus Ronnie James Dio caught everyone by surprise. The otherworldly ominousness of “Die Young” and “Children of the Sea,” the ruthless forward charge of “Neon Knights,” and the frighteningly massive riffs of “Heaven and Hell” lodge themselves immediately into your brain—where they’re destined to remain right up until doomsday.

EDITORS’ NOTES

When Ozzy Osbourne left Black Sabbath in 1979, a significant slice of their audience figured the end had come. So the sheer physical force of their first album fronted by Elf and Rainbow alumnus Ronnie James Dio caught everyone by surprise. The otherworldly ominousness of “Die Young” and “Children of the Sea,” the ruthless forward charge of “Neon Knights,” and the frighteningly massive riffs of “Heaven and Hell” lodge themselves immediately into your brain—where they’re destined to remain right up until doomsday.

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