16 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The British electronica group Plaid — Ed Handley and Andy Turner — have kept a low profile in the latter half of the ’00s. Their score for the 2009 Japanese live-action drama, Heaven’s Door, is their first release since the soundtrack they did for the 2006 anime, Tekkonkinkreet. (Both movies were directed by American visual-effects veteran Michael Arias.) Heaven’s Door depicts two terminally ill young people who flee a hospital and go on a wild trip. Mellow and melancholy, “Masato Shuffle” places a sturdy rock beat next to Indian drumming as keyboards and guitar strums color the sonic spectrum, while the uptempo “Tokyo Drive” features nicely contrasting keyboard patterns riding a glitchy groove. On “Seeking,” a jazzy rhythm supports plinky and brassy melodic lines, and “Durban Pain” is animated by tabla and other percussion. For “Two Rooms,” Plaid leaves the beats behind. The cut opens with interlocking chime parts that evoke a crystalline dream world before it morphs into a spare keyboard-and-strings section that gently brings the album to a quiet crescendo.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The British electronica group Plaid — Ed Handley and Andy Turner — have kept a low profile in the latter half of the ’00s. Their score for the 2009 Japanese live-action drama, Heaven’s Door, is their first release since the soundtrack they did for the 2006 anime, Tekkonkinkreet. (Both movies were directed by American visual-effects veteran Michael Arias.) Heaven’s Door depicts two terminally ill young people who flee a hospital and go on a wild trip. Mellow and melancholy, “Masato Shuffle” places a sturdy rock beat next to Indian drumming as keyboards and guitar strums color the sonic spectrum, while the uptempo “Tokyo Drive” features nicely contrasting keyboard patterns riding a glitchy groove. On “Seeking,” a jazzy rhythm supports plinky and brassy melodic lines, and “Durban Pain” is animated by tabla and other percussion. For “Two Rooms,” Plaid leaves the beats behind. The cut opens with interlocking chime parts that evoke a crystalline dream world before it morphs into a spare keyboard-and-strings section that gently brings the album to a quiet crescendo.

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Customer Reviews

5 out of 5

14 Ratings

great album!

hhhhmmm,

not a bad song in it. but itunes is missing tekkonkreet, this is not only a fantastic soundtrack but a great movie.

Plaid is back

esketch,

I was just talking about them on blip.fm and low and behold, they have a new album based on a movie I know nothing about. I've always liked their visceral linearity in their compositions. From what I've heard, they hold true to their style.

About Plaid

Although Plaid pre-existed the association, the duo's Ed Handley and Andy Turner spent most of their early recording years with Ken Downie as the dancefloor-confounding Black Dog Productions. Meshing well with Downie's vision of heavily hybridized post-techno and obscurantist thematics, the pair brought several nascent Plaid tracks to the Black Dog table on the group's debut, Bytes, a collection of tracks recorded by various iterations of the three members. The group recorded several albums and EPs throughout the early and mid-'90s, helping to forge a style of dance music one step removed from the 12" considerations of the average faceless techno act; Handley and Turner's mutual love of early hip-hop contributed BDP's more bawdy, street-level grit.

The pair split from Downie in 1995, and began rechanneling their efforts full-time with an EP on the neo-electro Clear label before signing to Warp. (The pair also recorded an album with European techno figure Mark Broom under the pseudonym Repeat, two tracks of which also made it onto the South of Market EP, released on Jonah Sharp's similarly located Reflective imprint.) Both of Plaid's first two full-lengths, 1998's Not for Threes and the following year's Rest Proof Clockwork, were issued in the U.S. through Nothing. Once Warp set up a home on American shores, however, Plaid made the natural switch with the long-awaited collection Trainer, a retrospective including much of their early, pre-BDP work. Their proper third album, Double Figure, followed in spring 2001, and the handy Plaid remix collection Parts in the Post was issued in 2003 by Peacefrog. The end of the year brought the duo's fourth proper LP, Spokes.

Plaid were quiet on the recording front for several years, finally returning in mid-2006 with Greedy Baby, a mini-album that found the pair co-billed with visual artist Bob Jaroc. Two years later, they made the small leap to recording the soundtrack for Heaven's Door, a Japanese film directed by Michael Arias. In 2011, they returned with Scintilli, released on Warp. Three years later, they nodded to the warmer and more playful sounds of their late-'90s material with Reachy Prints. This was followed by 2016's The Digging Remedy, which revisited the Detroit techno influence of their earliest work. The album featured flute and guitar by guest musician Benet Walsh, who had contributed to most of Plaid's albums since Not for Threes. ~ Sean Cooper

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