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Hell: The Sequel

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Album Review

Since the hip-hop community caught wind of them around 1999, Bad Meets Evil spent a decade in the more-a-legend-than-a-band category. Members Eminem and Royce da 5'9" spent those years not speaking thanks to beefs and feuds, but then the 2006 murder of their mutual friend, D12 member Proof, brought them back together. Fast-forward to 2011 and this EP re-launches the project, although fans have already been notified that Hell: The Sequel is “a collection of tracks” so excuse the mess. It’s not much of a mess, really, as the glossy “Lighters” feels more like a Bruno Mars track than Detroit diesel, while “stop stealing my music” tracks like “Take from Me” rarely become fan favorites. Everything else works just fine, with Royce displaying growth and superior skills that casual fans have slept on, while Em puts one foot in the past where gross humor (“Tell Lady Gaga she can quit her job at the post office/She’s still a male lady”) and scrappy rhymes reigned supreme. His other foot is in the Relapse/Recovery-era present with all the soul searching you’d expect, but as interesting as this career-spanning blend is, it is even more interesting when contrasted with Royce’s more traditional brand of thugging. Throughout his career, Mr. Mathers has given props to his Detroit hip-hop clan and spoken of his interactions, but his discography has been somewhat light on examples. Past the Mars cut, Hell: The Sequel helps right that wrong, providing the welcome sound of Shady meets the streets.

Customer Reviews

Bad Meets Evil - Hell: The Sequel

Collaborating for the first time since the late ‘90s, Eminem and Royce da 5’9” reunite after their infamous feud to uphold their promise and deliver to us, “Hell: The Sequel.” And I must say, what a phenomenal return this EP is. With classic hip-hop beats and lyrical masterpieces from both the artists, this project is a treasure for hip-hop purists. Nothing can seem to touch the chemistry between the two rappers as they continuously spit back and forth from intense moments, (Fast Lane) to comic moments, (A Kiss) to serious ones. (Lighters) Though this will not be as commercially successful as Eminems “Recovery,” the quality of music is just as good and arguably better. If you are a teenager who only knows Eminem for “Love the Way You Lie,” than buy the song “Lighters” and get out of here. But if you truly enjoy the quality of rap music, than I suggest the entire EP.

Welcome 2 Hell – 9/10 With a strong, Havoc produced beat, the intro to this anticipated EP comes out strong. Both Eminem and Royce’s flow are great and their chemistry is apparent right off the bat. A great opener.
Fast Lane – 9/10 The albums first single, this song goes hard. Royce shows off his classic flow and Eminem seems to go back to his “Eminem Show” type flow. Great first single to the EP.
The Reunion- 10/10 This song is a prime example of Eminems, “Marshall Mathers LP” flow and lyrics. The story telling from both rappers are phenomenal about if their actual character is the same as they portray in their lyrics. With a dark, gruesome beat and a catchy chorus, this is the EPs strongest point, but will definitely not be as popular or deserve as much respect as it should.
Above the Law – 9/10 Epic beat and lyrics, again both go so hard on the track. But the most notable quality about this track is the catchy chorus perfectly sampled.
I’m On Everything (feat. Mike Epps) – 9.5/10 This is the closest Eminem has come to Shady since the early 2000s. With a great sample from the comedian Mike Epps and hilarious Hangover references from Royce, this is a personal favorite on the album.
A Kiss – 9/10 “Tell Lady Gaga she can quit her job at the post office, She’s still a male lady.” Phenomenal lyrics about one-night stands and pretty much dissing pop artists. That Lady Gaga line is going to stir up some controversy!
Lighters (feat. Bruno Mars) – 8.5/10 I had my doubts about this song, but it actually turned out quite nice. Though it will do extremely well as a radio single, it just doesn’t fit with the pure hip-hop the rest of the album provides, but the lyrics are still very inspirational and both artists do well.
Take From Me – 9/10 One of the EPs lyrical strong points, Em and Royce snap back at the fans for illegally downloading music. With a beat and message similar to “25 to Life,” this song has a simple message, STOP STEALING MUSIC AND ACTUALLY BUY CDS.
Loud Noises (feat. Slaughterhouse) – 8.5/10 This is one of the most raw hip-hop tracks on the EP, but personally I don’t enjoy the beat that much, it just seems awkward to me. Still, both Eminem and Slaughterhouse kill it as usual.

Support classic hip-hop and buy this EP.

Hot Album

This album is amazing. Perfect balance between Em and Royce. A must buy!

Bad Meets Evil

They are back and they can't be stopped

Biography

Formed: 1997 in Detroit, MI

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Years Active: '90s, '10s

A hip-hop duo featuring Marshall Mathers and Ryan Montgomery -- aka Eminem and Royce da 5'9" -- Bad Meets Evil came together in 1997 thanks to the duo’s mutual friend, rapper Proof. After recording a handful of tracks and performing some shows around their native Detroit, Eminem embarked on a solo career. Besides launching his own solo gig, Royce would land on Em’s 1999 effort The Slim Shady LP on a track called “Bad Meets Evil,” but after the album’s massive success, Eminem remained a solo artist...
Full Bio
Hell: The Sequel, Bad Meets Evil
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