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Hello Destiny...

Goldfinger

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Album Review

Goldfinger discuss some serious issues on Hello Destiny... — political activism, suicidal despair, breakups, war, religion, media exploitation, and political prisoners — but do so with such bright, exuberant melodies that it's easy to overlook the lyrics. This makes the album work on two levels, engaging those who are there for the sociopolitical messages (albeit not particularly inspired or original ones) or just the fun and breezy nature of the tunes (albeit not particularly inspired or original ones). While the performances are solid on Hello Destiny..., there's nothing exceptional on display. Instead, John Feldmann, Kelly Lemieux, Charlie Paulson, and Darrin Pfeiffer sound settled in their groove. They're comfortable with each other and their influences, which allows the group to dabble in a myriad of styles here, including punk-pop, ska, and hardcore, while still maintaining a surprisingly smooth and consistent listen. Even the tough subjects dealt with in Feldmann's lyrics blend in nicely, thanks to his playful vocals. However, the bounce can't hide the more controversial items on offer (such as the manic "Handjobs for Jesus," which snidely takes both religious conservatives and George W. Bush to task, or "Free Kevin Kjonaas," an incessantly catchy number that advocates the release of an incarcerated animal rights activist), and that could make some listeners uneasy. Still, Hello Destiny... is at its heart a good-natured album, and it's refreshing to hear a band take on societal ills with hope instead of fury. It's by no means an essential album, but it's certainly a fun and educational one.

Customer Reviews

Too Political...

The sound is classic Goldfinger and I dig the use of the horns, however the lyrics are too political. I guess it can't be fart jokes forever but let's lighten up a bit.

Hello Destiny!

Goldfinger fans of old and new will be satisfied with an Album that flows through with solid music and excellent lyrics. As most Goldfinger fans know, John Feldman, lead singer and writer, doesn’t waste much time writing songs with useless messages. He takes writing songs very seriously, but also has an excellent ability to make the music fun and exciting. As expected this record has ska, punk, and pop sounds. It’s not as punk as their original CD and not as “pop” as Disconnection notice. It’s excellent mix of both, more like Hang Ups. “Get up” and “If I’m not right” are probably the strongest songs, with “Not amused” being close to unlistenable. For Goldfinger fans it’s been a long wait, but definitely worth it.

i'm surprised...

from what i've heard this is a step in the right direction, especially after they started sounding more and more popish..... anyway its good to have them back. i think....

Biography

Formed: 1994 in Los Angeles, CA

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Along with No Doubt, Sublime, and Rancid, the Los Angeles quartet Goldfinger helped contribute to a mini-U.S. ska-punk movement in the mid- to late '90s. The group was originally formed in 1994 by ex-Electric Love Hogs guitarist/singer John Feldmann and bassist/singer Simon Williams (who were both working at the same shoe store at the time), in addition to drummer Darrin Pfeiffer and an unnamed second guitarist (who would leave the group before any recordings could be issued and later become a pro...
Full Bio
Hello Destiny..., Goldfinger
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