12 Songs, 1 Hour 6 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Opeth’s 10th studio album plays like an equal tribute to early Yes recordings and the band’s keyboardist Per Wiberg, who left the Swedish metal band following its recording. Heritage marks a final shift from Opeth’s death metal trappings as it fully embraces progressive metal. Wiberg’s unaccompanied grand piano introduces the opening title track with a melancholy solo before the band joins in on “The Devil’s Orchard.” He switches from piano to Hammond B-3 organ and an eerie-sounding Mellotron as singer Mikael Åkerfeldt abandons his death growls for melodic inflections. The song’s instrumental interlude feeds from the roots of prog rock with clever time signatures and vintage instruments recalling early-’70s recordings by the late, great Bo Hansson. British folk–inspired acoustic arpeggios dance around “I Feel the Dark,” with Mellotron woodwinds lending an authentically classic sound. Fans of early Hawkwind and Deep Purple will warm to the familiar tones of “Slither,” while “Famine” plays like a Latin–tinged King Crimson. Both “Pyre” and “Face in the Snow” make for impressive bonus tracks.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Opeth’s 10th studio album plays like an equal tribute to early Yes recordings and the band’s keyboardist Per Wiberg, who left the Swedish metal band following its recording. Heritage marks a final shift from Opeth’s death metal trappings as it fully embraces progressive metal. Wiberg’s unaccompanied grand piano introduces the opening title track with a melancholy solo before the band joins in on “The Devil’s Orchard.” He switches from piano to Hammond B-3 organ and an eerie-sounding Mellotron as singer Mikael Åkerfeldt abandons his death growls for melodic inflections. The song’s instrumental interlude feeds from the roots of prog rock with clever time signatures and vintage instruments recalling early-’70s recordings by the late, great Bo Hansson. British folk–inspired acoustic arpeggios dance around “I Feel the Dark,” with Mellotron woodwinds lending an authentically classic sound. Fans of early Hawkwind and Deep Purple will warm to the familiar tones of “Slither,” while “Famine” plays like a Latin–tinged King Crimson. Both “Pyre” and “Face in the Snow” make for impressive bonus tracks.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
587 Ratings
587 Ratings
gen14 ,

You're Not A Fan

If all you "Opeth Fans" find awesome about an Opeth album are the death growls, you are not a fan of the band. Quit your whining and enjoy this epic work of art!

SkySkyRoxTights ,

Amazing!

This album is not only the best Opeth album yet, but one of the best albums of all time! It combines the highlights of 70's Prog with the darkest and most beautiful parts of Opeth's sound to create a totally different style and tone than Opeth has ever achieved. Martin Axenrot has really come into his own on this album, laying down a very groovy and modern approach to 70's Prog while equalling, if not surpassing, the level of chemistry that Marin Lopez shared with Akerfeldt. Also, while this album lacks screaming vocals it is still quite heavy and extremely dark. This album is the embodiment of pure brilliance; a mind boggling masterpiece that should change the scope and sound of Progressive Metal for years to come.

Shred 2 Death ,

Opeth does it again

They just can't be compared to the music of today.

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