8 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Palmer’s first solo album marks the intersection of several extraordinary musical forces. Recorded in New Orleans, New York, and Nassau, Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley is a quintessentially American album, even though Palmer was a sharp-dressed Englishman. His dream collaborators were the New Orleans funk ensemble The Meters, Allen Toussaint, and Little Feat, and—thanks to Alabama-born producer Steve Smith—that’s exactly who he got for his first solo outing. Pairing Little Feat's Lowell George with The Meters was a stroke of genius. The ensemble invests George’s “Sailin’ Shoes” with a sleek, percolating groove that outperforms Little Feat’s much-loved original. The patience and stylishness that Palmer and company bring to “Get Outside,” “Hey Julia," and Toussaint’s “From a Whisper to a Scream” is a radical antidote to the overblown production methods of the mid-'70s. Homegrown, humid, and distinctly nontraditional, the atmosphere of Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley remains extraordinary even when compared with much better-known works by Leon Russell or Dr. John.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Palmer’s first solo album marks the intersection of several extraordinary musical forces. Recorded in New Orleans, New York, and Nassau, Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley is a quintessentially American album, even though Palmer was a sharp-dressed Englishman. His dream collaborators were the New Orleans funk ensemble The Meters, Allen Toussaint, and Little Feat, and—thanks to Alabama-born producer Steve Smith—that’s exactly who he got for his first solo outing. Pairing Little Feat's Lowell George with The Meters was a stroke of genius. The ensemble invests George’s “Sailin’ Shoes” with a sleek, percolating groove that outperforms Little Feat’s much-loved original. The patience and stylishness that Palmer and company bring to “Get Outside,” “Hey Julia," and Toussaint’s “From a Whisper to a Scream” is a radical antidote to the overblown production methods of the mid-'70s. Homegrown, humid, and distinctly nontraditional, the atmosphere of Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley remains extraordinary even when compared with much better-known works by Leon Russell or Dr. John.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
59 Ratings
59 Ratings
mairecon ,

Musician credits at last!

There were never any music credits listed on this album but here they are - thanks to Steve York!

Tracks 1 & 3 are The Meters’ Art Neville (keyboards), Leo Nocentelli (guitar), George Porter (bass), Joseph Modeliste (drums). Steve York (harmonica solo) on Track 3.

Track 2 was recorded with UK musicians including Jim Mullen (guitar) and Jody Linscott (percussion). Jim & Jody may have overdubbed on other tracks.

I am not sure which band plays on track 4.

Tracks 5, 6, 7 & 8 is the New York rhythm section of Cornell Dupree (guitar), Richard Tee (piano), Gordon Edwards (bass) & Bernard Purdie (drums).

Lowell George is present on guitar on most of the album. Allan Toussaint also was involved in this record - his studio in New Orleans was used for some of this & two of his songs are on the record. I recall Robert telling me that Allan co-produced some of this record but in do not know for sure.

- per Steve York

Snob King ,

Thanks iTunes 7!

I concur with the aformentioned praise and want to applaud
whomever included the "gapless" album option.
It's the only way to achieve true bliss from the "Trilogy",
which is invariably what listeners called it when requesting it
back in the day.

Grimmbo ,

"Everyone Will Start To Cheer!"

.."When You Put On Your Sailin' Shoes!".."Tryin' To Keep Her Out Of Sight!"..Oohh; Yeah!-This is "Blue-Eyed Soul Music!" at it's finest! Way before the Monotonous Models & the Suave Suits; Robert Palmer was a strong singer back in his native England with quite a few Rock & Blues Bands! "Sneakin' Sally Through The Alley" finds him hooking up with members of Little Feat & The Meters; and let me tell you; "How Much Fun" it was when this LP got much radio play @ 1974! {Especially the Triology of: Sailin' Shoes/Hey Julia/Sneakin' Sally Through The Alley=Talk about "Gettin' The Party Started; Y'All!"} Robert Palmer had a great run of Good albums; Hit singles & He was "Music-Video Savvy"; to boot! (Gone too soon; like many of our best "Soul Men!") "Sally" is yet another "Sweet Seventies Set!"...by Grimmbo.

About Robert Palmer

The career of blue-eyed soul singer Robert Palmer was a study in style versus substance. While the performer's earliest work won praise for its skillful assimilation of rock, R&B, and reggae sounds, his records typically sold poorly, and he achieved his greatest notoriety as an impeccably dressed lounge lizard. By the mid-'80s, however, Palmer became a star, although his popularity owed less to the strength of his material than to his infamous music videos: taking their cue from the singer's suave presence, Palmer's clips established him as a dapper, suit-and-tie lady's man who performed his songs backed by a band comprised of leggy models, much to the delight of viewers who made him one of MTV's biggest success stories.

Born Alan Palmer on January 19, 1949, in Batley, England, he spent much of his childhood living on the island of Malta before permanently returning to Britain at the age of 19 to sing with the Alan Bown Set. A year later he joined Dada, a 12-piece, Stax-influenced soul group which soon changed its name to Vinegar Joe; after three LPs with the band -- a self-titled effort and Rock'n'Roll Gypsies, both issued in 1972, and 1973's Six Star General -- Palmer exited to mount a solo career, and debuted in 1974 with Sneakin' Sally Through the Alley, recorded with members of Little Feat and the Meters.

With 1975's Pressure Drop, he tackled reggae, a trend furthered following a move to Nassau prior to 1978's Double Fun, which featured Palmer's first hit, "Every Kinda People." With 1979's self-produced Secrets, his music moved into more rock-oriented territory, as typified by the single "Bad Case of Loving You (Doctor, Doctor)." Palmer's stylistic experimentation continued with 1980's Clues, a foray into synth-pop aided by Gary Numan and Talking Heads' Chris Frantz which yielded the club hit "Looking for Clues."

After 1983's Pride, Palmer teamed with the Duran Duran side project Power Station, scoring hits with the singles "Some Like It Hot" and "Get It On" (a T. Rex cover), which returned the singer to overt rock territory.

After exiting the band prior to a planned tour, Palmer recorded the 1985 solo album Riptide, a sleek collection of guitar rock which scored a number one hit with "Addicted to Love," the first in a string of videos which offered him in front of a bevy of beautiful women.

The follow-up, "I Didn't Mean to Turn You On," continued to play with the sex symbol image and hit number two, as did "Simply Irresistible," the first single from 1988's Heavy Nova. By 1990's Don't Explain, Palmer returned to the eclecticism of his earliest material; without any attendant soft-core videos, sales plummeted, but he stuck to his guns for 1992's Ridin' High, a collection of Tin Pan Alley and cabaret chestnuts. Two years later, Palmer's wide array of worldbeat influences cropped up again on Honey, which also featured guitar work from Extreme axeman Nino Bettencourt. Woke Up Laughing followed in 1998, it was an adventurous, if somewhat odd, collection of non-hit album tracks remixed and in some cases re-recorded.Rhythm & Blues, a slick set of adult contemporary pop, came out in 1999 to lukewarm sales and reviews. After a live album in 2001, Palmer bounced back with the future blues of 2003's Drive. However, Palmer had little time to enjoy it's release. On September 26, 2003 he died suddenly after suffering a heart attack. He was 54. ~ Jason Ankeny

HOMETOWN
Batley, England
GENRE
Rock
BORN
January 19, 1949

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