10 Songs, 28 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Although the tongue-in-cheek cover image displays the leather-clad Out of Order members grappling with one another in a scene reminiscent of a Roger Corman biker movie, the distaff trio’s debut album makes it exceedingly clear that they aren't playing around. The no-nonsense band’s terse-but-tuneful attack doesn’t flag at any point throughout Hey Pussycat, even when the old-school punk assault slows down to a gritty, bluesy grind for the garage rocker “Don’t Do That.” And whether the trio is risking some kind of sonic speeding ticket with the breakneck hardcore roar of “Horror Show” or evoking ‘90s alt-rock à la The Breeders on the angular, melodic “Secret,” the lyrics never get lost amid the crash and clang of the hammering rhythms and buzzsaw riffs. That’s fortunate, because this New York threesome is that most rare of beasts in the modern age: a raw, feral punk posse with something to say.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Although the tongue-in-cheek cover image displays the leather-clad Out of Order members grappling with one another in a scene reminiscent of a Roger Corman biker movie, the distaff trio’s debut album makes it exceedingly clear that they aren't playing around. The no-nonsense band’s terse-but-tuneful attack doesn’t flag at any point throughout Hey Pussycat, even when the old-school punk assault slows down to a gritty, bluesy grind for the garage rocker “Don’t Do That.” And whether the trio is risking some kind of sonic speeding ticket with the breakneck hardcore roar of “Horror Show” or evoking ‘90s alt-rock à la The Breeders on the angular, melodic “Secret,” the lyrics never get lost amid the crash and clang of the hammering rhythms and buzzsaw riffs. That’s fortunate, because this New York threesome is that most rare of beasts in the modern age: a raw, feral punk posse with something to say.

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