10 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Little Feat leader Lowell George had already laid down some of rock ’n’ roll's finest moments (Sailin’ Shoes, Dixie Chicken) by the time he recorded his only solo album. (He was also fed up with Little Feat’s increasing fondness for the suddenly mainstream sound of jazz-fusion.) George’s pleasing and believable voice could sell any theme, and he was a poet of the streets whose gift for spinning yarns from the darkside dovetailed perfectly with his big-as-California heart. There’s some of that here, on the songs he wrote, but mostly there’s lots of the New Orleans sweetness that he went for on Dixie Chicken: mixes of funk, R&B, pop and jazz. Allen Toussaint’s warm “What Do You Want the Girl Do” leads things, while a funked-up yet unfussy Feat retread (“Two Trains”) simply sings. George tackles Rickie Lee Jones’ “Easy Money,” which helped jumpstart Jones’ own career. George's own “20 Million Things” and Fred Tackett’s “Find a River” are such tender regrets that they sum up his troubled life, which, sadly, ended just after this album dropped.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Little Feat leader Lowell George had already laid down some of rock ’n’ roll's finest moments (Sailin’ Shoes, Dixie Chicken) by the time he recorded his only solo album. (He was also fed up with Little Feat’s increasing fondness for the suddenly mainstream sound of jazz-fusion.) George’s pleasing and believable voice could sell any theme, and he was a poet of the streets whose gift for spinning yarns from the darkside dovetailed perfectly with his big-as-California heart. There’s some of that here, on the songs he wrote, but mostly there’s lots of the New Orleans sweetness that he went for on Dixie Chicken: mixes of funk, R&B, pop and jazz. Allen Toussaint’s warm “What Do You Want the Girl Do” leads things, while a funked-up yet unfussy Feat retread (“Two Trains”) simply sings. George tackles Rickie Lee Jones’ “Easy Money,” which helped jumpstart Jones’ own career. George's own “20 Million Things” and Fred Tackett’s “Find a River” are such tender regrets that they sum up his troubled life, which, sadly, ended just after this album dropped.

TITLE TIME
4:48
3:45
4:36
3:18
2:22
3:31
2:50
3:44
2:31
2:28

About Lowell George

As Little Feat was disbanding in late 1978, their lead guitarist/songwriter Lowell George recorded a solo album, Thanks I'll Eat It Here, that sounded as loose and funky as the band in their prime. After its release the following year, he set out on tour to support the album. Sadly, George died of a heart attack while on the road; he left behind a body of gritty, eclectic, and funky rock & roll. On the first five Little Feat albums, his songwriting and instrumental talents are more apparent than on his solo effort, yet that doesn't detract from the record's pleasures. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

  • ORIGIN
    Hollywood, CA
  • BORN
    April 13, 1945

Songs

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