14 Songs, 1 Hour 3 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the ornate album title suggests, Of Montreal are all about peculiar details and not being understood too quickly. Primarily the brainchild of singer-songwriter Kevin Barnes, this Athens, Georgia-based musical “collective” (members come and go without a sense of permanence) record a shimmering psychedelia that recalls the Flaming Lips in its eclectic ambitions and mix of silly and serious influences. Like the Lips, Barnes has discovered his inner funk and while he dreams of Sly Stone, he’s more like Beck stuck in falsetto. “We Were Born the Mutants Again With Leafling” (their titles are inscrutable) nicely reconciles this dancefloor urge with the songwriter’s natural inclination towards childlike melodies. But it’s the pulsating highway buzz of the 12-minute “The Past is a Grotesque Animal” that perfectly delivers the cathartic epiphany Barnes is hungry to capture. It’s said that much of the album deals with Barnes’ difficult life of the past few years — a marriage that has teetered on the brink — but that can only come to focus after one navigates past the frilly keyboards and sunshine-evoking arrangements that suggest a sandbox where any instrument is available for the asking. Can tragedy be this goofy? Why not?

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the ornate album title suggests, Of Montreal are all about peculiar details and not being understood too quickly. Primarily the brainchild of singer-songwriter Kevin Barnes, this Athens, Georgia-based musical “collective” (members come and go without a sense of permanence) record a shimmering psychedelia that recalls the Flaming Lips in its eclectic ambitions and mix of silly and serious influences. Like the Lips, Barnes has discovered his inner funk and while he dreams of Sly Stone, he’s more like Beck stuck in falsetto. “We Were Born the Mutants Again With Leafling” (their titles are inscrutable) nicely reconciles this dancefloor urge with the songwriter’s natural inclination towards childlike melodies. But it’s the pulsating highway buzz of the 12-minute “The Past is a Grotesque Animal” that perfectly delivers the cathartic epiphany Barnes is hungry to capture. It’s said that much of the album deals with Barnes’ difficult life of the past few years — a marriage that has teetered on the brink — but that can only come to focus after one navigates past the frilly keyboards and sunshine-evoking arrangements that suggest a sandbox where any instrument is available for the asking. Can tragedy be this goofy? Why not?

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
268 Ratings
268 Ratings
bchase ,

truly, truly outstanding.

I bought this album with mixed expectations. Of Montreal has had an overly bouncy sound in the past, and while their first album was founded based on a breakup, it never seemed to stop their electrifying mix of pop, synth, and brilliant indie rock. However, this album proved a slightly different step for Of Montreal. A better step. The album focused around a brilliant centerpiece, "The Past is a Grotesque Animal," and it truly provided the album a focus. As the songs build up to this nearly twelve-minute opus with its pounding riff and baseline, you get a feeling of just how in-tune with their insturments and eachother this band is. This album is great. The singing is spot on, the drums and bass interlock to form a solid rythym section, and the guitar effectively rounds out the other parts to create a seamless, wonderful piece of music. Listen to this album as a whole, all the way through. You will not get the great, seamless effect that this album is designed for, the gapless playback that makes it so excellent will be lost to thine ears.

But enjoy it-- music this good doesn't come along that often. Best so far of 07, hands down, and better than nearly everything that came out in 06.

Geeje ,

...

E6 Junkies a moron. this album is pretty great.

spikyfred ,

Quite possibly the best Of Montreal Album to Date

This album is amazing There is not one bad osng on the enitre album they could basically make singles out of every song. Every song is different from the last from The discoish beat of Gronlandic edit and Faberge Falls for Shuggie to the Hard rock sound of she's a rejecter to the pop sound of Suffer for fashion. and the suprisngly catchy Heimdalsgate like a Promethean curse easily becomes a favorite. Every song on this album is amazing in it's own way For the lyrical aspect and the sound of it I could think of no better way to spend your $10:00

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