11 Songs, 31 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the ‘20s and ‘30s, guitarist and singer Sam Chatmon played alongside his two older brothers—fiddler Lonnie Chatmon and guitar phenomenon Bo “Carter” Chatmon—in The Mississippi Sheiks. The Sheiks were one of the most popular outfits operating in the Mississippi delta during that period, and their impressive musical repertoire encompassed elements of blues, jazz, country, string bands, minstrel show music, and sentimental balladry. Sam Chatmon appeared on few of the Sheiks' original recordings, but he toured and performed extensively with the group. When he was rediscovered during the folk and blues revival of the mid-‘60s, his instrumental powers were still considerable, and his experiences playing with the Sheiks made him an invaluable fount of knowledge. The recordings on Hollandale Blues were recorded at Chatmon’s home in Hollandale, Miss., in 1976. Though Chatmon was nearly 80, he sounds in fine form here. His performances of standards like “St. Louis Blues” and Bo Carter’s “Old Devil” have a casual, uninhibited joy that makes them stand out from the general run of rediscovery-era blues recordings.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the ‘20s and ‘30s, guitarist and singer Sam Chatmon played alongside his two older brothers—fiddler Lonnie Chatmon and guitar phenomenon Bo “Carter” Chatmon—in The Mississippi Sheiks. The Sheiks were one of the most popular outfits operating in the Mississippi delta during that period, and their impressive musical repertoire encompassed elements of blues, jazz, country, string bands, minstrel show music, and sentimental balladry. Sam Chatmon appeared on few of the Sheiks' original recordings, but he toured and performed extensively with the group. When he was rediscovered during the folk and blues revival of the mid-‘60s, his instrumental powers were still considerable, and his experiences playing with the Sheiks made him an invaluable fount of knowledge. The recordings on Hollandale Blues were recorded at Chatmon’s home in Hollandale, Miss., in 1976. Though Chatmon was nearly 80, he sounds in fine form here. His performances of standards like “St. Louis Blues” and Bo Carter’s “Old Devil” have a casual, uninhibited joy that makes them stand out from the general run of rediscovery-era blues recordings.

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About Sam Chatmon

A product of the prodigious Chatmon family that included not only Lonnie of the famous Mississippi Sheiks but also the prolific Bo Carter and several other blues-playing brothers, Sam Chatmon survived to be hailed as a modern-day blues guru when he began performing and recording again in the '60s. Sam continued brother Bo's tradition of sly double-entendre blues to entertain a new generation of aficionados, but he also showed a more serious side on songs like the title track of the early Arhoolie anthology I Have to Paint My Face.

Chatmon began playing music as a child, occasionally with his family's string band, as well as the Mississippi Sheiks. Sam launched his own solo career in the early '30s. While he performed and recorded as a solo act, he would still record with the Mississippi Sheiks and with his brother Lonnie. Throughout the '30s, Sam travelled throughout the south, playing with a variety of minstrel and medicine shows. He stopped travelling in the early '40s, making himself a home in Hollandale, Mississippi, where he worked on plantations.

For the next two decades, Sam Chatmon was essentially retired from music and only worked on the plantations. When the blues revival arrived in the late '50s, he managed to capitalize on the genre's resurgent popularity. In 1960, he signed a contract with Arhoolie and he recorded a number of songs for the label. Throughout the '60s and '70s, he recorded for a variety of labels, as well as playing clubs and blues and folk festivals across America. Chatmon was an active performer and recording artist until his death in 1983. ~ Jim O'Neal

HOMETOWN
Bolton, MS
GENRE
Blues
BORN
January 10, 1897

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