11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

When British metalcore band Architects lost founding guitarist Tom Searle to cancer in 2016, it was like losing a family member; for drummer and Tom’s twin brother Dan, he literally had. Many bands would go on a hiatus or even break up after such a tragic event; Architects went on to channel their grief into their eighth album, Holy Hell, their most personal yet. Building on their enormous sound—and on Tom’s legacy as the band’s chief songwriter—they color their extreme, melodic repertoire with melodramatic orchestration and electronic beats while chronicling the two years following his death.

Listen to the final minute of opening track “Death Is Not Defeat” and you’ll hear a pure, intense expression of physical catharsis: As frontman Sam Carter howls the song’s title over swelling percussion and frenetic strings, you can picture him unleashing every ounce of his pain and emotion into the mic. “Hereafter” faces the immediate trauma that followed: “I wasn’t ready for the rapture…I’ve been learning to live without, and I’m fighting with broken bones.” They start to find acceptance on “Royal Beggars”: “’Cause we’re broken…but we’re coping.” And the thunderous closer, “A Wasted Hymn,” looks to the future over a wall of epic strings, drums, and guitar: “Life comes at a cost, but all is not lost.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

When British metalcore band Architects lost founding guitarist Tom Searle to cancer in 2016, it was like losing a family member; for drummer and Tom’s twin brother Dan, he literally had. Many bands would go on a hiatus or even break up after such a tragic event; Architects went on to channel their grief into their eighth album, Holy Hell, their most personal yet. Building on their enormous sound—and on Tom’s legacy as the band’s chief songwriter—they color their extreme, melodic repertoire with melodramatic orchestration and electronic beats while chronicling the two years following his death.

Listen to the final minute of opening track “Death Is Not Defeat” and you’ll hear a pure, intense expression of physical catharsis: As frontman Sam Carter howls the song’s title over swelling percussion and frenetic strings, you can picture him unleashing every ounce of his pain and emotion into the mic. “Hereafter” faces the immediate trauma that followed: “I wasn’t ready for the rapture…I’ve been learning to live without, and I’m fighting with broken bones.” They start to find acceptance on “Royal Beggars”: “’Cause we’re broken…but we’re coping.” And the thunderous closer, “A Wasted Hymn,” looks to the future over a wall of epic strings, drums, and guitar: “Life comes at a cost, but all is not lost.”

TITLE TIME

About Architects

With influences ranging from Hatebreed, to Shadows Fall, to the Dillinger Escape Plan, Brighton, England's Architects play a complex mixture of metalcore, death, and math metal, laced with alternately violent and comedic lyrics. After getting their start in 2005, Architects recorded their debut album, Nightmares, the very next year with a lineup consisting of twin brothers Tom (guitar) and Dan Searle (drums), Tim Hillier-Brook (guitar), Tim Lucas (bass), and Matt Johnson (vocals), but the latter was to be replaced on-stage by new frontman Sam Carter in January of 2007, during the last show of the band's subsequent tour.

Later that year, Architects recorded their sophomore effort, Ruin (introducing new bass player Ali Dean), and signed a worldwide deal with Century Media for its re-release in 2008. Their first American tour was next on the agenda, and saw the group paired up with Suicide Silence, Beneath the Massacre, and the Tony Danza Tapdance Extravaganza, among other bands. Upon their return to England, Architects recorded their third album, to be titled Hollow Crown, which arrived in 2009. The band took its sound in a relatively subdued, post-hardcore direction on its fourth album, 2011's Here and Now, but transitioned back to a heavier sound the following year on Daybreaker. The band continued to expand their sound, pushing things in both extreme and ambient directions on their sixth album, Lost Forever // Lost Together, which appeared in 2014. Two years later, the band issued All Our Gods Have Abandoned Us, which they described as their "heaviest and darkest work" to date. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia

ORIGIN
Brighton, England
GENRE
Rock
FORMED
2004

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